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PETER DIXON
Frequent User
Username: petenlinid

Post Number: 52
Registered: 8-2003
Posted on Sunday, 29 April, 2012 - 08:54 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

I assume that many readers of this forum own their own car hoists. Having committed myself to continued nurturing my Silver Shadow a bit longer and acknowledging that economics demand that to do so I need to undertake more of the maintenance and repairs myself in future than I have in the past, and having spent the last two days flat on my back doing relatively minor tasks that should have taken me a quarter of the time I am seriously considering installing one myself. I would appreciate any comments and recommendations on best type for purpose, suppliers etc. I Was considering a 2 post, 4 ton, single phase (240V) mostly because the are much cheaper than 4 post. Any advice and recommendations would be greatly appreciated. I should say that love working on the old girl but would love it even more if it was a tad easier.
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Martin Cutler
Prolific User
Username: martin_cutler

Post Number: 187
Registered: 7-2007
Posted on Tuesday, 01 May, 2012 - 09:11 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Hi Peter,

I have 4 hoists in my workshop, favourite for working on old cars is a Bishamon 4 poster, with scissor plate in the middle, means I can lift the front or rear wheels off the ground. Don't really like lifting chassis cars on a 2 poster, but on a monocoque car like a shadow, it should be ok. Bought the Bishamon second hand for $4000, runs 3 phase.

Cheers

Marty
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Nigel Johnson
Frequent User
Username: nigel_johnson

Post Number: 75
Registered: 12-2008
Posted on Wednesday, 02 May, 2012 - 02:29 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

I'm not to sure about lifting Shadows and Spirits on post lifts. ACH 01253 had been lifted on a four poster and the back flanges on the jacking points were damaged.How about a conventional roll on lift or even dig a pit.
Regards Nigel
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PETER DIXON
Frequent User
Username: petenlinid

Post Number: 53
Registered: 8-2003
Posted on Wednesday, 02 May, 2012 - 11:58 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Many thanks to all for your responses. I have pretty much settled on the 2 post 4 ton hoist concept plus the use of extra supports front and rear as and when necessary. I still struggle with the idea of having all those mechanical bits and pieces hanging off a suspended body, but by a multitude of sources I am assured it is the only way to go. It's also useful that the 2 post fully installed will cost only slightly more than half the price of a 4 poster.
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Brian Vogel
Frequent User
Username: guyslp

Post Number: 67
Registered: 6-2009
Posted on Wednesday, 02 May, 2012 - 12:25 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Peter,

I've lifted SRH33576, my '78 Silver Shadow II, on a two-post Rotary lift many times and it's been just fine.

The only thing I'd strongly recommend is using sill blocks at the lift points just like you'd do if you were lowering the car on to jack stands (or if you're jacking the car up at the side center jacking point with a floor jack).

Brian
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Jan Forrest
Grand Master
Username: got_one

Post Number: 336
Registered: 1-2008
Posted on Wednesday, 02 May, 2012 - 09:36 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

As best as I recall, without resorting to delving into the workshop manual again, I believe that Crewe recommend that the rear wheels not be allowed to hang from the rebound straps for extended periods of time as it can strain the Detroit joints at the inner ends of the drive shafts. Although I think that this can be mitigated by removing the rear wheels to relieve some of the weight. Even so I would still slip a chock of timber into each of the straps to limit the drop of the drive shafts before lifting the car if it was to remain up in the air for long.
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Lungmuss
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 92.13.21.58
Posted on Saturday, 05 May, 2012 - 05:21 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Hello Jan, Just seen this thread re: hoists. I believe you are based in the UK? About 2 years ago I purchased a 3 ton scissor lift from www.automotechservices.co.uk. I see from their website they are also suppplying 2 post lifts etc. The company is based in Staffordshire if you would like more details I would be pleased to assist. Good luck, Clive

(Message approved by david_gore)
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Jeffrey McCarthy
Prolific User
Username: jefmac2003

Post Number: 294
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Saturday, 05 May, 2012 - 10:11 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Just on this. The problem for most of us would be where to put the lift; not having a garage a)with enough vertical space and b)horizontal space to be able to park the car and still open the doors.

I have the space outdoors to do it but obviously it's not a good idea to put an electric lift outdoors.

The best suggestion, short of digging a pit, that I've come across is one of those drive on cantilevered contraptions they use in car yards. The ones where you drive up a ramp and when you cross the fulcrum the rear end of the ramp lifts up.

Apparently used ones come on the market from time to time.

SRH20280 is currently at the colour painting stage - apparently I'm going to meet her again in the fullness of time...

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PETER DIXON
Frequent User
Username: petenlinid

Post Number: 54
Registered: 8-2003
Posted on Saturday, 05 May, 2012 - 10:18 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Once again thanks for the food for thought regarding this matter. After a bit more research and discussion with private hoist owners and my wife (who absolutely hates the concept of only two posts holding up "that great big car") I have changed my mind in favour of a four poster. Net result is I have bought a professionally reconditioned Tecalamite with a portable jacking beam, giving me a bit of the best of both worlds.

One thing I have learned from this process is that there are one or two really shonkey dealers out there who are selling absolute junk followed up with the same quality of support and after sales service.

It is very much a case of caveat emptor.
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lungmuss
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 92.5.147.87
Posted on Saturday, 05 May, 2012 - 11:24 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Hello Jeffrey,
I had a similar problem of where to put a 4 or 2 post lift. I chose the scissor lift as although it is outside under my carport it would fit easily in a garage. it goes almost flat to the floor, requires a flat hard surface and you can store it under the car. I wrote a short piece for Rob's Crew'd Jottings issue 26, page 6 with photo's and a diagram. Again any questions or further information I would be pleased to help. Just to say I wish I had purchased one years ago.
Good luck, Clive

(Message approved by david_gore)
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Nigel Johnson
Frequent User
Username: nigel_johnson

Post Number: 76
Registered: 12-2008
Posted on Monday, 07 May, 2012 - 06:47 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Sorry, I made the assumption that a four post lift was the type with adjustable arms that radiate from a central ram.
I live and learn, the role on type are excellent.

Regards, Nigel.
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Dave Puttock
Experienced User
Username: ariel

Post Number: 25
Registered: 5-2010
Posted on Tuesday, 08 May, 2012 - 09:50 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

I once saw a 4 post lift outside with a carport type roof over it, such that when the lift went up the roof went up with it. The rest of the time it just looked like a regular car port. Quit clever I thought and unobtrusive.
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Omar M. Shams
Grand Master
Username: omar

Post Number: 1364
Registered: 4-2009
Posted on Wednesday, 29 November, 2017 - 04:07 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

look at this guys..................

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4k4AFt9lf7k
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Geoff Wootton
Grand Master
Username: dounraey

Post Number: 1864
Registered: 5-2012
Posted on Wednesday, 29 November, 2017 - 04:42 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Hi Omar

From the video I saw that the operator used a kneeling pad. I didn't realize such things existed. I will get one. It will save me having to tie on knee protectors every time I need to get under the car.

Geoff
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Omar M. Shams
Grand Master
Username: omar

Post Number: 1366
Registered: 4-2009
Posted on Wednesday, 29 November, 2017 - 05:11 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Dear Geoff,
When we had a our Geek Meet last September in Beauliue, Alan, Richard and I saw many stalls selling variations on foam pads for kneeling and working under cars. We also thought that they were a great idea.
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Jan Forrest
Grand Master
Username: got_one

Post Number: 947
Registered: 1-2008
Posted on Wednesday, 29 November, 2017 - 06:56 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Omar. I've checked eBay this evening and the only one I can find on there at the moment comes from Austria and costs 1,200 plus postage.

As for the kneeling pad, Geoff; I get mine from the shop.

Can you guess how much they cost?
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David Gore
Moderator
Username: david_gore

Post Number: 2748
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Wednesday, 29 November, 2017 - 07:18 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

I use these joinable foam rubber mats on cold concrete floors all the time; soft, comfortable, versatile, easy to clean and cushion dropped tools/parts:

https://www.bunnings.com.au/polytuf-50-x-50cm-solid-black-foam-mats-4-pack_p4490383

AUD12 for a pack of 4 - what more can I say......
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Geoff Wootton
Grand Master
Username: dounraey

Post Number: 1866
Registered: 5-2012
Posted on Wednesday, 29 November, 2017 - 07:53 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Hi Jan

Good to see you on the forum again.

I was out earlier and picked one up from our local hardware store - Lowes. 10 bucks, so a little more than the pound shop. It's decorated with bright yellow and black stripes to give it the workshop look. I'll use it just as soon as I can get the cat off it.

Geoff
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richard george yeaman
Grand Master
Username: richyrich

Post Number: 878
Registered: 4-2012
Posted on Wednesday, 29 November, 2017 - 11:11 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Hi Jan I agree with Geoff.

Richard.
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Alan Dibley
Prolific User
Username: alsdibley

Post Number: 113
Registered: 10-2009
Posted on Wednesday, 29 November, 2017 - 07:01 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

A bit of ostentation here. My kneeling pads are a pair of ex-Silver Spirit lambswool rugs. Super comfortable and washable.

My choice of car-lifter is a half-pit/half-ramp outside under the car port. It solves the weather problem and the height problem. Folk said "Beware the fume build-up in the pit" but a gentle breeze solves that and in extreme conditions I've used a fan to clear a bit of petrol fume, with anti-spark precautions. About 3 feet deep pit (with stairs at one end) + 2 feet high ramp made of breeze-blocks (so no danger of collapse or falling off.

Alan D.

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