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Chris Buckenham
Experienced User
Username: chris_buckenham

Post Number: 37
Registered: 6-2012
Posted on Friday, 04 April, 2014 - 04:27 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Good Evening Everybody,

If you were going to make a batch of wheel studs what specification steel might you consider - EN8 ? Hardened ?

Any feedback greatly appreciated.

Best regards,

Chris Buckenham
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David Gore
Moderator
Username: david_gore

Post Number: 1376
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Friday, 04 April, 2014 - 08:04 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Hi Chris,

Not as straight forward as you might expect as wheel nuts/studs are a critical safety item for obvious reasons and may be subject to local Design Rules and specific ISO [or designated equivalent] standards relating to manufacture, testing and certification. Use of non-complying "home made" items may present road-worthiness and legal liability problems in the event of property damage and/or personal injury arising from an accident where the use of non-standard items becomes an issue.

The following SAE standards are some examples of the specifications and properties applying to wheel nuts:

http://standards.sae.org/j2283_201210/

http://standards.sae.org/wip/j2316/

http://standards.sae.org/j1102_201304/

You will need access to a library or car manufacturer which has sets of the SAE [and ISO] Standards to read the standards to gain an appreciation of what is involved.

I will not indicate any material and heat treatment specifications for wheel nuts/studs as I am not familiar with the applicable standards/design rules in the country where the items will be used. Appropriate heat treatment followed by testing and documentation of the test results for any custom-made items will be an important consideration.

EN8 would not rate highly on my list of appropriate grades for custom-made wheel fasteners.
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Paul Yorke
Grand Master
Username: paul_yorke

Post Number: 1184
Registered: 6-2006
Posted on Sunday, 06 April, 2014 - 06:13 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

what are the wheels studs going to be for?

Only asking because in 40+ years of maintaining these vehicles I can't remember changing any.
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Randy Roberson
Prolific User
Username: wascator

Post Number: 208
Registered: 5-2009
Posted on Monday, 07 April, 2014 - 05:05 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Personally I would go to the wheel manufacturers like Kelsey-Hayes, et al. Often they provide wheel studs and even the hubs and brakes as well as the wheels, to auto and equipment manufacturers. I would be very reluctant to go out on my own knowledge especially when there is so much "settled science" among these manufacturers. There is a probability that just about any stud which was used very widely might still be available from one of these OEMs; perhaps some of them have reference materials on their web sites.
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Max Lynn Christenson
New User
Username: max_christenson

Post Number: 8
Registered: 3-2014
Posted on Wednesday, 09 April, 2014 - 12:25 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Wheel studs can be gotten from Flying Spares, so there is no reason to do a custom batch. Here is the Flying Spares link:

http://www.flyingspares.com/shop/rolls-royce-spirit-spur-bentley-turbo-mulsanne/wheels-and-tyres/wheel-studs-nuts.html

This particular link covers studs for cars from 1980 to 1998, but there are other model years on Flying Spares website.

Also, note that the studs are for the right side and the left side, so the threads are right or left hand.

It's probably cheaper to buy the correct studs from a vendor, such as Flying Spares, than to attempt to make "a batch", because you cannot simply make one "batch" for all the wheels: they must be either for the right or left side therefore, at least two batches for every car). Two different batches increases their costs. Just buy the correct studs from a reputable vendor.
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Richard Treacy
Grand Master
Username: richard_treacy

Post Number: 3010
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Wednesday, 09 April, 2014 - 06:16 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

I have heard of reinventing the wheel, but reinventing the wheel stud ??

A hint. Every time a rear brake rotor is replaced on a 1987+ SZ the wheel studs are replaced. They come with the rotor. As an aside, at the Flying Spares price of 18+etc etc each for studs it would be cheaper to buy a new rear SZ 20k+ brake rotor, remove the studs, use the studs on whatever SY, SZ or even possibly SC car needs them and throw the rotors in the bin. You could even sell the new rotor without studs for a tidy price.....
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Richard Treacy
Grand Master
Username: richard_treacy

Post Number: 3012
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Wednesday, 09 April, 2014 - 06:32 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

To explain, some later SZ alloy wheels have steel wheel nuts. Earlier cars, including SZ cars with Turbo R Ronan alloy wheels, have magnesium bronze wheelnuts which give way long before a stud is even stressed through corrosion. With steel nuts in salty environments, Crewe cars first started to show stud seizures through corrosion. That's why Crewe ships the later 20k+ series SZ rotors, the ones suited to ABS, with new studs fitted. They can, of course, be reused if desired.

RT.
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Chris Buckenham
Experienced User
Username: chris_buckenham

Post Number: 38
Registered: 6-2012
Posted on Thursday, 10 April, 2014 - 01:53 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Men , thanks for your replies,

I have been abroad in the Far East and now back into contact in Thailand on holiday.
The studs on my car are very poor , the nut on the nearside even worse. Over the last week my research has confirmed that the items are thread rolled.
I'm not sure that I've mentioned this in the past but I am a fairly competent Manufacturer of automotive parts with literally the best bar fed mill turn machines available not to mention operators. I was just interested inthe expert view.

We will not be manufacturing the studs for now , but I will run the nuts , both hands , if anybody would like a handful just let me know. They will be for to any one who requires a few.
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Chris Buckenham
Experienced User
Username: chris_buckenham

Post Number: 39
Registered: 6-2012
Posted on Thursday, 10 April, 2014 - 01:57 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Richard Treacy,

Very clever , yes I like your idea old chap.
A ver y good alternative suggestion.

Chris

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