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KC
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 168.210.90.232
Posted on Tuesday, 10 August, 2004 - 16:30:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

I have recently acquired a magnificent 1947/8 Mk VI B108CF. Before I do too much mileage Iíd like to check everything, change all oils and give the car a general once-over. However, I am still trying to find a workshop manual, so I am flying blind for the moment. In view of this I will be asking a lot of questions over the next few weeks, as I really donít want to do anything that may compromise the reliability or longevity of the car. I really appreciate the advice given so far.

Hereís my first question. What oil should I put in the steering box? Normal gear oil like EP 90?

I would really like to get hold of a workshop and owners manual for the Mk VI. Can anyone help? I have been in contact with the various overseas clubs, but they want me to join their clubs before I may buy anything from them. With our weak currency it is very expensive to join a club that is several thousand miles away just so that I can have the privilege of buying a workshop manual. I donít understand the thinking behind this. Surely one should encourage people who want to maintain and keep these cars on the road? Perhaps they should have members and non-members prices. I will pay a premium if I have to.

Anyway, thank you very much for all the good advice that is freely offered on this forum.

Regards
KC (South Africa)
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John Dare
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 144.138.194.142
Posted on Tuesday, 10 August, 2004 - 21:18:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Congratulations on your purchase KC! Dare I venture an OPINION on your steering box oil/lube,lest I provoke experts who abound, invariably ready to TELL us "their" way is "best". THIS is what I have found from experience in the real world, and after discussions with mechanics who have worked (professionally) on these cars for decades. Oil, even a "thick" oil like 90 grade, will eventually seep out of your box. NO, you DONT need to re-seal/re-build your box,but simply select a KNOWN proprietory brand dedicated steering box lube that WORKS. My preference is for the Australian "Penrite" label (probably sold in SAFR) or equivalent. You might need to heat the lube (its like grease but wont cavitate!) and SLOWLY feed it to the box via a suitable funnel and (maybe) a plastic tube. I get by with a small funnel and heat the lube in a saucepan of hot water so that it will pour out ok. No convoluted "science" nor intense/searching technical jargon or "proclamations" here, just some simple facts gained from experience. Good Luck. Ps. W/shop manual/s are available from the UK based R.R.E.C
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Laurie Fox
Yet to post message
Username: laurie_fox

Post Number: 1
Registered: 6-2004
Posted on Wednesday, 11 August, 2004 - 00:21:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Greetings to all

Several things come to mind on reading the first two posts. First of all it would be interesting for KC to check whether B108CF still has the original engine since the original engine would have had 5/16" cylinder head studs and the 3/8 studs came in at about B95DZ. Don`t go by the engine number since in many cases the old engine numbers were transferred to the replacement engines. If the engine number is something like BxxxC and the studs are 5/16" then the engine is probably original, particularly if it has a by-pass oil filter fitted. Several other engine changes came along after B108CF and when KC gets some documentation he will be in a better position to interpret the information if he knows whether the engine is original or later (or perhaps earlier).

I find that most people who are not familiar with Mk VI`s need to know how the brakes work and to that end I have put Section G of the Service Handbook on to a file which can be sent by email. If anyone who does not already have this information would like me to send it to them, please let me know.

Regarding lubrication for the steering box, the owners handbook says use SAE30 but many of us have found out that it leaks out rather quickly. I am interested to hear that John Dare has put something else in as I did the same several years ago with very good results. Details are on the Bentley Drivers Club website under "Old Technical Forum Topic: Mk VI -Grease - front suspension". The BDC website has had some changes recently and my plea to keep the Technical Forum there accessible to non-members has been accepted and I have transferred all of the old postings to the new forum so that they can still be searched. A search for "Kango" brings up two matches, at the moment, and one of these is about grease in the steering box. The search word is highlighted in orange which makes it easier to pick out since the topic is rather long and is not primarily concerned with the steering box.
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KC
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 168.210.90.232
Posted on Wednesday, 11 August, 2004 - 00:32:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Hi Laurie

Thank you very much for your efforts in keeping the BDC forum open to non-members. I have spent hours on it already!

I would really appreciate the information on the brakes. My e-mail address is kcs@tbm.co.za

Thank you very much.

With regard the steering grease. Can one just add it to whatever is already in there?

Regards
KC
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Richard Treacy
Grand Master
Username: richard_treacy

Post Number: 290
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Thursday, 12 August, 2004 - 06:19:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

I would strongly recommend that you stay with oil in the steering box if possible. The cam and roller arrangement is not ideally suited to any grease substitute, although grease will do if the box is overdue for repair.

I must admit to using the last resort, multi-purpose grease, years ago in my R-Type when it was leaking. However, after I finally bit the bullet and rebuilt the box 20 years ago, including new bearings and a new steering roller, I switched back to 90-grade gear oil. It has never lost a drop since.

Originally straight 30 grade oil was specified. However I am sure that anything from multigrade engine oil to EP90 gear oil is fine. If the box is not leaking, it would be a pity to bog it up with grease prematurely.
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John Dare
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 144.138.194.25
Posted on Thursday, 12 August, 2004 - 20:02:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Mankind has progressed far since Mk6s/"R"-Types were new, over half a century ago. Welcome to the new millenium with diverse and sophisticated lubricants,vastly improved fuels concurrent with advances in brakes and tires, which is why we shouldnt fret if we dont have/cant get "India"/Whatever,tires or comply with other miscellany as randomly called up in our handbooks. Besides,as we were so clearly instructed in recent times,one should not "blindly follow factory bulletins or manuals". Moving on.. Penrite and other global mnfrs. have invested vast amounts of money to research,develop and produce specialty products, with a range of lubricants formulated for a given application, being mindful of vehicle type,design and age etc. Penrite steering box lubricant is a typical example, this being a self levelling grease containing non corrosive EP additives to provide and maintain a film strength etc.You dont need to be Einstein,or have a university degree, to know what "self levelling" means (No, NOT S/Shadow suspensions!) and indeed it may be advantageous if you DONT have one,since the simplest terms and issues are in some instances, the most difficult to understand. I like to think I am a Particularly Practical Person, Ergo..IF your MK6/"R" Type steering box leaks oil (any) WHY "rebuild" it (at considerable expense/inconvenience) merely to arrest a leak, when you can employ a superior, specific purpose lubricant that DOESNT leak?. Sounds simple enough to me. "Penrite" steering box lubricant- now available at a store near you.
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Richard Treacy
Grand Master
Username: richard_treacy

Post Number: 291
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Thursday, 12 August, 2004 - 20:24:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

You could also use banana skins. We used them when I was at school to quieten humming Holden diffs.
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John Dare
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 144.138.195.18
Posted on Thursday, 12 August, 2004 - 21:37:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

What a stirling idea.. I can try them in my Shadow, but I wont need them in my Range Rover differentials, since all three (3) are "Superlative" and QUIET too. Sorry do I feel for Penrite and other global lubricant mnfrs. with multi million dollar R&D budgets. All that money wasted when the solution was so readily available at the wholesale fruit market.We live and learn.

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