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Martin Cutler
Prolific User
Username: martin_cutler

Post Number: 153
Registered: 7-2007
Posted on Sunday, 28 March, 2010 - 07:32 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Hi guys,

I have been recommended a product called "Yield". Apparently it is made in the US, but I have not had any luck finding anything on google, apart from forums talking about it. Does anybody know about this product? Any possibility that They can post some data on where to buy it? Yield is supposed to be a very good penetrating oil, suitable for loosening the head on my R type, which is still stuck fast on the 3 remaining studs.....

Cheers

Marty
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David Fairbrother
Yet to post message
Username: davidf

Post Number: 1
Registered: 2-2010
Posted on Sunday, 28 March, 2010 - 08:46 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Martin,
I dont know about "Yield" but the best penetrating oil you can get is a homemade mix of Automatic transmission fluid and Acetone. The mixture rate is one to one, shake it well, squirt it on the stud/nut and it will work better that any other product. If the head has grown onto the stud you may have to use a tube cutter to free it up.

David
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Martin Cutler
Prolific User
Username: martin_cutler

Post Number: 154
Registered: 7-2007
Posted on Tuesday, 30 March, 2010 - 08:32 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Hi David, have heard of that, but no actual experience. Can you use molasses on alloy? I know it works really well on cast iron.

Cheers

Marty
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Bill Coburn
Moderator
Username: bill_coburn

Post Number: 1227
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Wednesday, 31 March, 2010 - 06:57 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Martin/ Try http://www.chemsearch.com/ and let all of us know how it works!
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Martin Cutler
Prolific User
Username: martin_cutler

Post Number: 155
Registered: 7-2007
Posted on Sunday, 04 April, 2010 - 08:36 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Hi Bill,

Not listed in their product listings, but if you search their website, it comes up. Says it is recommended for aluminium heads. Have sent them an email, see if we can get a hold of a few cans.

Cheers

Marty
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Martin Cutler
Prolific User
Username: martin_cutler

Post Number: 156
Registered: 7-2007
Posted on Wednesday, 07 April, 2010 - 09:26 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Hi Bill,

Got a contact in Chemsearch in Sydney, have to buy a box of 12 cans. They suggested Blackwoods. Will try them tomorrow.

Cheers

Marty
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Bill Coburn
Moderator
Username: bill_coburn

Post Number: 1228
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Wednesday, 07 April, 2010 - 09:41 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Thanks Marty. Put me down for a couple as I am always in need of releasants. Be careful in Blackwoods. The floor of our local one is littered with the skeletons of customers who waited........
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John Budden
Experienced User
Username: johnb

Post Number: 27
Registered: 4-2006
Posted on Monday, 12 April, 2010 - 11:07 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Marty- if you have two more to spare would love to get.
John Budden
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Martin Cutler
Prolific User
Username: martin_cutler

Post Number: 157
Registered: 7-2007
Posted on Monday, 26 April, 2010 - 08:34 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Hi guys,

Yield is a bit hard to obtain easily. I obtained a can of "liquid spanner"that is made in QLD, smells like acetone. Have spent the long weekend playing with the R type. I have come to the conclusion I need to drill out the remaining studs, no other alternatives. I will be purchasing a magnetic base drill to acurately drill out the offending studs. Will keep you all posted.

Cheers

Marty
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Peter Colwell
Frequent User
Username: peter_colwell

Post Number: 91
Registered: 3-2005
Posted on Tuesday, 27 April, 2010 - 07:10 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

There are some products on the market that work by sudden freezing of the recalcitrant bolt. Might be worth a check;
http://www.techshopmag.com/Article/43057/loctite_freeze__release_penetrating_oil_loosens_rusted_bolts.aspx
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David Fairbrother
New User
Username: davidf

Post Number: 2
Registered: 2-2010
Posted on Tuesday, 27 April, 2010 - 02:14 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Martin,

I am not familiar with a R type engine however I was reading an article in the RREC Bulletin magazine No.70 from Jan 1972 where a gentleman had a problem removing the aluminium heads of a P3 and this may help your problem.
Three studs on each bank were corroded to the heads and he could not move them so after trying a few other things he drilled down the side of each stud with a 1/32" drill to about a depth of 1" to where the cavity opens up as the stud narrows and then using a hypodermic needle he filled each hole and down around the side of the stud with vinegar.
After three days the vinegar had removed all the corrosion and he was able to remove the heads.

I only wish I had read this before I removed the head on my P11 which took my brother and I three full days.

David
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Martin Cutler
Prolific User
Username: martin_cutler

Post Number: 158
Registered: 7-2007
Posted on Saturday, 01 May, 2010 - 09:47 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Vinegar sounds like a very interesting idea. I don't think there is a larger hole lower down in the head of an R type, but drilling a small hole to allow access of vinegar or other substances sounds very interesting.

Cheers

Martin
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Jan Forrest
Prolific User
Username: got_one

Post Number: 131
Registered: 1-2008
Posted on Sunday, 02 May, 2010 - 07:53 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

After battery acid, vinegar is the strongest acid (acetic) most people have daily access to and will readily dissolve aluminium, aluminium oxide and a lot of other things. A better option is to get some citric acid crystals from a home brew shop and mix a heaped teaspoon of them in a cup of hot, or even boiling, water. The advantages are that this acid will only dissolve non-ferrous oxides while leaving the pure metals untouched and is so innocuous that it is used in a lot of foodstuffs - just check the list of ingredients on sweet and crisps packets if you doubt my word. I've used it for years on brass, copper and soft alloys to remove surface corrosion and leave a bright, polished finish. Just don't get it into any open cuts or sores as it stings like ... heck.
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Bill Payne
Experienced User
Username: wimpy

Post Number: 49
Registered: 1-2007
Posted on Tuesday, 04 May, 2010 - 01:26 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Would vinegar remove oxidation on chrome?
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Jan Forrest
Prolific User
Username: got_one

Post Number: 132
Registered: 1-2008
Posted on Wednesday, 05 May, 2010 - 07:40 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

No idea, but "Solvol Autosol" (if it's available down there) works well on chrome. It's a cream that gently polishes off corrosion without scratching. After washing it off and drying the surface completely you should use a standard car polish to fill the pores in the plating and prevent water getting at the underlying steel.