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Martin Cutler
Prolific User
Username: martin

Post Number: 67
Registered: 10-2004
Posted on Tuesday, 09 August, 2005 - 03:22 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Hi guys,

The stick on pinstriping on my Mk VI is starting to lift, has been on for 6 or so years. Has anyone played with the (American) Beugler Striper? Looks like a neat thing, is available here in Sydney. Price I got was $229 + gst for the Deluxw kit, containing 3 wheels.

Reckon I could go crazy with one of these, everything would get pinstriped!
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Richard Treacy
Grand Master
Username: richard_treacy

Post Number: 857
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Tuesday, 09 August, 2005 - 06:52 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Martin,

The Beugler Striper pinstriper is a brilliant tool.

You can best mail order from the US: the deluxe kit costs US$95.

For steel cars the magnetic guide strip is very useful to achieve a dead-straight stripe. However, for aluminium as in your case, and for the doors of our later cars, the natural chine is a perfect guide for the Beugler alignment piece without the magnetic strip. I actually bought the Professional kit, but only ever used the wheels of the Deluxe: go for the Deluxe.

http://www.beugler.com/kits.html

I have used this fine kit for over 20 years. The pinstripe will outlast the main finish.

A note do NOT use automotive paint for the pinstripe. A perfect finish and texture comes only with exterior enamel house paint believe it or not. Furthermore, if you make a mistake, you simply rub it off with turps and start again with no damage to your finish. If you use automotive paint, it looks wrong and is do-or-die: any mistakes are irreversible.

The appearance is of a very expertly hand-done pinstripe. It makes the stick-on variety look rather silly. To feather the ends, you simply roll the tool to the side.

Highly recommended. I bought mine at the 1983 Sydney Motor Show.

RT.
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Richard Treacy
Grand Master
Username: richard_treacy

Post Number: 858
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Tuesday, 09 August, 2005 - 07:11 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

ps I have used it on my R-Type and T-Series with excellent results.

T-Series Front

T-Series Rear
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Richard Treacy
Grand Master
Username: richard_treacy

Post Number: 859
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Tuesday, 09 August, 2005 - 07:32 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

For anyone not knowing what the hell we are talking about, here are the kits and guide magnetic strip:


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Martin Cutler
Prolific User
Username: martin

Post Number: 68
Registered: 10-2004
Posted on Wednesday, 10 August, 2005 - 10:35 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Thanks Richard, I'm sold.

Marty
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Norman Geeson
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 62.253.64.18
Posted on Thursday, 11 August, 2005 - 01:27 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Martin

This tool does indeed provide professional results as Richard has indicated. I have actually been successful using sign writers paint for the coach lines, it stays liquid just long enough to do the job without runs.I cannot tell you the make up of the paint, but it is used for signwriting trucks.

Like many more jobs on the cars it is better to work out well exactly how you are going to proceed, for example when the tool comes up against the door handles. In addition work out and practice how you are going to complete each end, at the front and rear of the car.In short, think twice and act once.

Before starting each line I find it best to roll the tool across the surface of some cardboard, this gets the paint flowing nicely off the pin striping wheel.I move straight from the cardboard onto the car. You also need to be, shall I say brave, the side of a Bentley MKVI takes about 2 to 3 minutes if that. If you mess around the lines are not as sharp as the wheel tends to flood with paint.Practice on some cardboard, the heavy type that is used to protect white goods.

Tip,don't forget to roll just around the edge of each door on the MKVI, to provide a professional finish to each end of the door lines.

Regards

Norman

Norman Geeson
Peterborough
England

(Message approved by david_gore)
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Richard Treacy
Grand Master
Username: richard_treacy

Post Number: 863
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Friday, 12 August, 2005 - 12:01 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Thanks, Norman.

Of course, it would be nice to know that your pinstripes were done by a craftsman's hand brush. There are very few such people around, and it's way past by capability. The Beugler result is a very satisfying close second.

I remember one painter saying in jest for a Silver Shadow "I'll hold the brush steady. You drive 'er past.".

What profile does signwriter's paint leave ? Conventional enamel leaves a beautiful quarter circular segment cross section. I have seen sprayed stripes which look awful with a rectangular cross section and butt edges. Enamel takes quite some time to dry, but it is viscous with a high surface tension and will not run. A big advantage of slow drying paint is that it has time for the surface tension to render the paint wheel's knurl indentations invisible.

Maybe signwriter's paint combines the benefits of fast and slow drying paint. Whatever, it is important in my opinion that the pinstripe paint's solvent will not dissolve the surface of the car's finish. You can then wipe it off and start again if you muck it up a few times as I always do.

As you say, prictice and practice on cardboard, then do the stripe swiftly with some soft cloth and solvent (turps ?) handy. Practicing with a dry wheel on the car is not on as the knurls in the wheel may damage the finish.

RT.
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Martin Cutler
Prolific User
Username: martin

Post Number: 69
Registered: 10-2004
Posted on Sunday, 14 August, 2005 - 07:31 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Hi guys,

The tricky part on the Freestone & Webb will be the lower line, where it runs through a tight tuirn and down the front of the rear guard. There is a swage line to follow, but this might really test me.

Getting the old sticky stuff of is proving a challenge as well!