Imperial Liquid Measurements Log Out | Topics | Search
Moderators | Register | Edit Profile

Australian RR Forums » General Discussion » Imperial Liquid Measurements « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Christian S. Hansen
Grand Master
Username: enquiring_mind

Post Number: 678
Registered: 4-2015
Posted on Monday, 08 January, 2018 - 07:39 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Does the UK still use the Imperial system for liquid volume measurements and if not, when did they stop?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

christopher carnley
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 5.80.23.23
Posted on Monday, 08 January, 2018 - 08:06 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

The UK uses litres (1.75 pints) and millilitres ie 1/1000 litre or 1cc. Metrication from 1971 didnt take effect completely until 2000 when previouly either imp or met was used.
Beer and cider is still sold by the Imp pint, about 474 ml, and also milk sold in glass bottles.
What is the reason for the Q?

(Message approved by david_gore)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Christian S. Hansen
Grand Master
Username: enquiring_mind

Post Number: 679
Registered: 4-2015
Posted on Tuesday, 09 January, 2018 - 12:31 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Christopher...
Thank you for your reply. Like you, I am interested in the Pre-War and EPW models and while I have been recommissioning several of my stored vehicles, I have noticed that the fluid capacities as quoted in the manuals and the actual amounts necessary to bring them up to either the overflow ports or markings on dipsticks varied and was always more than the quoted capacities. It was of special concern with the Springfield PI gearbox that oddly enough does not have any dipstick and thus no way of checking the fluid level other than draining and measuring. What were they thinking?!

Finally it dawned on me that the manuals were referring to Imperial quarts and I was filling with US quarts and thus the question. I wonder how many other US owners have not figured this out? Many I suspect. As evidence, both the PI and PII that allegedly had been serviced by the prior owners were on low rear end fluid. No doubt because they added the amounts shown in the manuals without realizing that those were Imperial quarts rather than US quarts and that for every four quarts specified, they really needed to put in five quarts in order to get them properly full. Accordingly, with the Springfiled PI gearbox that is quoted as having a four quart capacity, I will install five!
Thanks for confirming my suspicion!

.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alan Dibley
Prolific User
Username: alsdibley

Post Number: 119
Registered: 10-2009
Posted on Tuesday, 09 January, 2018 - 06:55 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

It might help to remember/understand that an Imperial pint is 20 fluid ounces, but a pint elsewhere is 16 fluid ounces. 16 ounces to the pint tallies with 16 ounces to the pound, so a pint of (non-Imperial) water weighs a pound, but in UK:-
"A pint of water weighs a pound and a quarter", so it rhymes.
Easy-peasy. (????)

Alan D.

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Bold text Italics Underline Create a hyperlink Insert a clipart image

Username: Posting Information:
This is a public posting area. Enter your username and password if you have an account. Otherwise, enter your full name as your username and leave the password blank. Your e-mail address is optional.
Please quote Chassis Numbers for all vehicles mentioned.
Password:
E-mail:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action: