Image Resizing and Quality Test Log Out | Topics | Search
Moderators | Register | Edit Profile

Australian RR Forums » General Discussion » Image Resizing and Quality Test « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

David Gore
Moderator
Username: david_gore

Post Number: 1212
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Monday, 11 February, 2013 - 09:12 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

The following test uses images supplied by Brian Vogel which have been resized to the allowable sizes for this forum:

1

2

3

4

Brian, the images you supplied were, in my opinion, standard 150dpi photocopier scans [typical file size 60/150KB] and are marginal as they do not have fine enough detail for good reproduction. In my experience, scans need to be 300dpi or better for good reproduction in 640 x 480 pixels.

The following photograph of a cracked Shadow Pitman arm and its replacement was scanned from a standard photo print at 300dpi and has been resized to 640 x 480 high quality using Photoshop:

5

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Richard Treacy
Grand Master
Username: richard_treacy

Post Number: 2772
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Tuesday, 12 February, 2013 - 09:04 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Best simply post the PDF in the first place and be done with the messing around. Smaller, clearer and easier.

Just click on the icon to open it, to view it or to save it.

RT.
application/pdf
Cooling System - To Fill.pdf (50.9 k)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Richard Treacy
Grand Master
Username: richard_treacy

Post Number: 2774
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Tuesday, 12 February, 2013 - 09:35 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Posting a PDF is especially ideal when the original or its inherent extract is a PDF in the first place. That applies to most documents in the Technical Library and to all TSD5000/6000-series IETIS/MTVIEW/ASSISTA SZ documents. In case of multiple pages, usually without loss of quality you may always compress a PDF very easily to reduce its size if the 100kB limit is reached whilst still posting those multiple pages in a single file.

Incidentally, and not really on the core of this post, the procedure for filling most SZ cars, as shown in the above PDF, misses a vital step. Before filling, lift the LHS front of the vehicle to tilt its front bumper at 15 degrees. That helps the bleeding process enormously !! Many of these cars run for a few weeks dumping coolant after a refill even when the book procedure is observer to the letter until all the last bubbles self-bleed, but the tilt method never fails to make the job quick and sure. Many bemused mechanics miss this point.

RT.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Brian Vogel
Prolific User
Username: guyslp

Post Number: 246
Registered: 6-2009
Posted on Wednesday, 13 February, 2013 - 12:25 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Richard,

What PDFs does IETIS extract from? I can create PDFs from IETIS by printing through PDF Creator, but there are no native PDF files under the IETIS folders that I can find using a Windows search.

The problem (if one can call it that) still remains with the strict 640x480 pixel picture size limit, but that can be worked around when necessary with larger pictures.

Brian
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

David Gore
Moderator
Username: david_gore

Post Number: 1213
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Wednesday, 13 February, 2013 - 08:58 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Brian,

One of the reasons for the 640 pixel width restriction is to ensure the image will appear in its entirety on all monitor screens. Wider images have the down-side that sideways scrolling becomes tiresome if the wider image is too large for the monitor screen. The entire thread is affected not just the post with the wide picture.

Richard's comment about including PDF files as attachments is noted but my experience has been my PDF files have exceeded the limit even after reducing the file size by quality reduction of the contents and using the compression tool in Acrobat after compilation.

David - whose life is one challenge after another.......
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Jonas TRACHSEL
Experienced User
Username: jonas_trachsel

Post Number: 31
Registered: 2-2005
Posted on Wednesday, 13 February, 2013 - 05:54 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Recently I have come across the abbreviation "IETIS" in several threads. My ignorance prevents me to understand the meaning of this expression and hence the whole contribution usually makes no sense to me. Can anybody explain what IETIS is?
Jonas
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Brian Vogel
Prolific User
Username: guyslp

Post Number: 249
Registered: 6-2009
Posted on Thursday, 14 February, 2013 - 01:30 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Jonas,

I never knew what the IETIS acronym meant until I looked it up in response to your query: Integrated Electronic Technical Information System.

From the 1990 model year forward, there were no Workshop Manuals, Illustrated Parts Manuals, etc., printed. This information was instead bundled into a software package: IETIS.

So, it now makes sense to refer to the source of information for cars after 1990 as coming from IETIS.

Brian, who notes you'll also see references to TSD6000 which, as far as I know, is the same thing as IETIS (at least for the 1990-2000 model years, I don't know what the TSD number is for IETIS for the Seraph/Arnage period)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Jan Forrest
Grand Master
Username: got_one

Post Number: 450
Registered: 1-2008
Posted on Saturday, 16 February, 2013 - 03:01 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

I found to my cost the reason for not using strong alkaline concentrations some years ago when trying to clean out the blockages in the engine of my then Reliant Scimitar GTE. Although the block was iron, the radiator overflow wasn't and it almost completely dissolved away. I've since discovered the advantages of true organic acids - in particular Citric. When used in concentrations up to 500 grams of crystals per gallon it will not attack most pure metals, but is strongly effective against metal salts although the cheaper chrome (usually nickel) plating can be completely stripped from the surface of the plated article at high temperatures. There are You Tube postings about using it to strip rust from iron/steel components as well as the use of molasses and water; the latter I have yet to try out.

I've used citric acid to good effect in both of my Toyota Estimas which are very sensitive to coolant condition and will often exhibit terminal cracks in the cylinder heads at relatively low mileages - often not much over 100K. Our semi house trained Estima Club expert mechanic (and revered chairman - fuel consumption 2 bacon butties and 5 mugs of char per hour) has maintained several of the marque for some years which have been used as taxis and which can now boast over 400K 'under the belt' on the original heads!

Legal Note: The usual 'at your own risk' conditions apply to this recommendation.

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Bold text Italics Underline Create a hyperlink Insert a clipart image

Username: Posting Information:
This is a public posting area. Enter your username and password if you have an account. Otherwise, enter your full name as your username and leave the password blank. Your e-mail address is optional.
Please quote Chassis Numbers for all vehicles mentioned.
Password:
E-mail:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action: