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Jeffrey McCarthy
New User
Username: jefmac2003

Post Number: 5
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Sunday, 03 June, 2007 - 20:44:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

I am currently trying to familiarise myself with the difference between these to help decisions during my buying search. Can anyone direct me to discussions/technical articles on the problems with the early Shadows and/or the merits of each system. With thanks, Jeff

(Message edited by jefmac2003 on 03 June 2007)
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Bill Coburn
Moderator
Username: bill_coburn

Post Number: 907
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Sunday, 03 June, 2007 - 21:17:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Unless you are well set up to do your own work I would suggest you keep away from 4 speed Shadows. They were interim solution to a supplyt problem until they could get supplies of the GM400. Parts for the Hydramatic would have me worriedas from memory I think only about 3000 were made and any spares would have to come from the new masters. The GM400 by comparison is a common but very effective box used on millions of cars and thousand of RR's and B's. If you can afford it buy the latest Shadow you can get.
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Paul Yorke
Experienced User
Username: paul_yorke

Post Number: 49
Registered: 6-2006
Posted on Sunday, 03 June, 2007 - 21:34:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Hi Jeffery.

In my experiance, I would say 3 speed box wins every time.

As a driver and R-R mechanic I can not think of one advantage to the 4 speed. If you have the choice between buying two similar condition cars, then I would always go for the 3 speed.

If you have the choice between a beautiful 8/10 9/10 10/10 (10 out of 10 condition) 4 speed car and a 6/10 7/10 3 speed car then the 4 speed would be my choice.

There is nothing wrong with the 4 speed if you look at it isolation, or even compare it to other automatic transmissions, but compare it to the three speed :/

The disadvantage are:
Not as smooth.
Not as reliable.
Not as strong.
Much more difficult to repair.
Parts are much more expensive.
Parts are rarer
Oil cooling bad
No Park gear while the engine is running.
More prone to weeping.
More difficult to set up.
More expensive in the long run.

errrrrr, I'm sure there are probably others . . .

Somebody will probably suggest some advantages to the 4 speed, but I can't think of any!

Sorry I can't point to any articles or more technical details.

When buying one - Try many, buy the best car you can, and have it inspected by a R-R specialist.
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Richard Treacy
Grand Master
Username: richard_treacy

Post Number: 1239
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Monday, 04 June, 2007 - 04:54:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Compare the Silver Shadow Hydramatic 4-speed to a Rolex and the THM400/3L80 to a Swatch.

The Rolex Hydramatic looks good, but doesn't work. Not even remotely as it should even with huge annual maintenance bills, and has shockingly poor longevity. Looks good. Doesn't work. Nice on the mantlepiece with a pool of fluid as decoration. I don't put transmissions on the mantlepiece as they belong out of sight and keeping the fluid to themselves.

The Swatch is cheap, looks so-so, but lasts for ages and works. If a Rolex breaks, you will take out a mortgage and have it fixed so that it at least keeps poor time. If a Swatch breaks you can buy a new one for a very few dollars or replace the battery for $1.

Bill and I both have earlier cars (S2 and R-Type) with Hydramatics, although the SY versions (only sold on RHD cars from 1965 to 1967 and never on LHD SY cars which always have had the THM400/3L80 3-speed trynsmission) have sprag clutches as a stop-gap and with poorer longeivity than of the R and S cars produced from 1952 to 1965. Bill may or may not agree that we love them, but in honesty the Swatch THM400/3L80 walks all over them. The Rolex Hydramatic internals are beautiful to look at, but the THM400/3L80 Swatch just does a superb job.
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Jeffrey McCarthy
New User
Username: jefmac2003

Post Number: 6
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Tuesday, 05 June, 2007 - 12:12:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Thanks everyone - I'll go for the 'Swatch'.Jeff
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John Kilkenny
Experienced User
Username: john_kilkenny

Post Number: 41
Registered: 6-2005
Posted on Tuesday, 05 June, 2007 - 12:47:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

As the owner of an early Silver Shadow (SRH1405) with the 4-speed Hydramatic Transmission I wonder how many of these cars with transmission problems our experts have actually encountered.
The transmission is an enclosed system and provided the fluid is changed regularly and the car is driven normally it will give many years of reliable service.
The Hydramatic transmission was used in all non-Canada and U.S. Shadows up to about Serial No 4000.
I have had my car for 24 years and the only transmission repair in that time has been a recent minor job to fix fluid leaks. I wish I could say the same for the rest of the car !
One does not expect a 40 year old car to have gear changes as smooth as today's models but with proper use of the throttle the difference is barely discernible.
The additional third gear also comes in handy for higher speed overtaking (up to 120 Kph) or when driving in heavy traffic.
The lack of a Park position is no big deal, Neutral plus the handbrake can easily be used.
With the engine switched off, selecting Reverse locks the transmission and holds the car stationary.
In the opinion of my local repairer the 4-speed box is no less reliable than the 3-speed and has the advantage of being adjustable.
Parts and specialist repair expertise are still available.
Apart from the different transmission there are some other attributes of the early Shadows. In my opinion they are a more attractive car with their steel bumpers, air inlets, and nicer dashboard layout.
So as Paul says, pay for an expert's opinion before buying any car, and this is critical for a car of sophisticated design up to 40 years old. This particularly applies to the hydraulics.
But if everything checks out OK don't be put off by the four speed box.
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Glenn Amer
Experienced User
Username: recordo

Post Number: 26
Registered: 4-2005
Posted on Tuesday, 05 June, 2007 - 18:31:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

the four speed box has been the least of my problems with my car (SRH1964). In four years I have replaced everything except the box and engine...
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Paul Yorke
Experienced User
Username: paul_yorke

Post Number: 50
Registered: 6-2006
Posted on Tuesday, 05 June, 2007 - 19:29:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Glenn, quick, go touch something wood! lol.

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Richard Treacy
Grand Master
Username: richard_treacy

Post Number: 1242
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Tuesday, 05 June, 2007 - 20:57:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Donít get me wrong. John.

That 4-speed Hydramatic is surely a unique and beautiful piece of engineering. That's why I called it a Rolex. All the components are wonderfully machined and finished. What is astonishing is that Crewe re-engineered the SCIII Hydramatic for the Silver Shadow, yet the production run was so miniscule. They are only fitted to RHD cars up to chassis 4478 as the LHD cars all have the Swatch 3-speed THM400 from the outset. Given that the first chassis is 1001 or so and many are LHD, that's a very small number of vehicles indeed. The Hydramatic in the Silver Shadow overcame many of the shift quality and drum timing issues of the Silver Clouds by virtue of relying more on sprag clutches than on bands.

Mentioning speeds in the intermediate gears, in third gear the Hydramatic tops out at 135km/h allowing for fluid flywheel slip, whilst the THM400 manages 131 in second gear, but it is not as if many people would push them so far. Thatís not much difference, and is more than offset by the extra torque produced by the THM torque converter in top gear. A Turbo R with the THM400 and the later 2.28 final drive is good for over 180km/h in second gear.

The biggest risk is a major repair. If only a master repair kit is required, and thatís usually the case, then the two types will only set you back a few hundred dollars in parts. Thatís gaskets, clutch packs, seals and various other items. For a full overhaul including sprags, whitemetal bearings (Hydramatic only), ball races and all, the picture changes: the Hydramatic spares alone can cost up to $7,000 compared to $700 for the THM. If something is broken, like a split drum, the skyís the limit on a Hydramatic. By comparison, the THM major components are widely available new or secondhand for a song. You can even buy a complete good secondhand THM400 for a few hundred dollars as a parts donor. They will be in every wreckerís yard you visit, coming from Holdenís larger V8s, later Jaguar V12s and others.

I read an Autocar test from when the Silver Shadow was first released. They drove it to Switzerland to compare it to a LHD Silver Shadow delivered there. The testers remarked that, whilst the 4-speed car was excellent, it was overshadowed by the sheer driveability of the LHD cars with their THM400s. They were puzzled by the very existence of the reworked Hydramatic in early RHD cars.

So, if you want collectabilty it has to be the 4-speed. As a vehicle driven often, it has to be the THM400 cars.
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Jeffrey McCarthy
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Username: jefmac2003

Post Number: 7
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Wednesday, 06 June, 2007 - 08:14:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

For me it comes down to a vehicle I can reliably drive (a shadow!??) & parts/local help availability is key - I'm over 5 hours from Melbourne, which adds an extra $500 or so to repairs I can't do myself. I'd love to be able to afford to do a concours restoration of the rarer car (with that dash!) but reality has to intervene somewhere, even with an RR. But all these observations have been helpful -- if I do buy an early one I'll have the transmission really well checked for likely longevity & condition. Many thanks guys, once again.

Incidentally, Chapmans was paid the most exquisite back-handed compliment by a salesman yesterday. "We don't like to use him because he gives the buyer a long list of everything that's wrong, with no summary of what's important & after the 2nd or 3rd time it turns people off. We don't think it's fair to the dealers"

Guess who I'll be using for the pre-purchase inspections!

Cheers, Jeff
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bob UK
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Posted From: client-86-29-83-233.brig.adsl.tesco.net
Posted on Monday, 04 June, 2007 - 03:37:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

The reason for 4 speed was that it did not have a torque convertor which meant that 1st gear needed to be lower than the 3 speed's 1st gear.

because there no torque multiplication on the 4 speeds fluid flywheel it means that the gaps between the gears is in effect larger than the 3 speeds gaps with the torque convertor give each gear a 2:1 ratio on top of the mechanical ratio.

All this means that in first gear off the line the 3 speed's 1st gear is lower than the 4 speed's 1st gear and then at about 1800 revs the 3 speed's 1st gear is actually higher than the 4 speed's 1 st gear.

A fault that I have seen a few times is where the torque convertors middle element jams up and the torque convertor becomes a fluid flywheel and the car becomes very slugish when pulling away.

I had a Rover 2000 SC do this and because the engine was a big worn as well the car had trouble getting to 30 mph. A new Torque convertor made the car much better and the engine wear showed much less.

(Message approved by david_gore)
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David Gore
Moderator
Username: david_gore

Post Number: 727
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Thursday, 07 June, 2007 - 16:15:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

A late contribution to this topic. The 4 Speed Hydramatic transmission was fittted to the first automatic Holdens up to the "classic" EH model in the 1960's. Due to their popularity in comparison to later Holdens, these cars remained on the road in country areas in relatively large numbers for many years and are still a popular collectors car for those with limited budgets [I still see EJ and EH models being used as "daily drivers" here on the Mid-North Coast of NSW]. For this reason, most country auto transmission repairers should have at least one staff member who knows these transmissions "inside out" - this is not quite the case in the cities however Club Member Neville Vassalo in Sydney has an auto transmission repair business at Bankstown that regularly overhauls Hydramatics.

As an aside, the GM Hydramatics [in common with the 2 speed Fordomatic fitted to the Falcons of this era] were capable of being "push-started" if the car had a flat battery [unlike later auto transmissions]; only problem was you had to get them up to about 15mph [30Kmph]to generate enough fluid pressure to turn the engine over. I presume the R-R modified Hydramatics would have retained this feature. If you were fortunate to score the family car for a night out with your girlfriend and spent the evening in the local lover's lane, you soon learnt to park the car on a hill where you could allow the car to roll down to get a start if you ran the battery flat using the valve car radio. Far better than having to walk home and explain to your parents why the car was where it was!!

Jeffrey, I am in complete agreement with Richard Treacy's advice "So, if you want collectabilty it has to be the 4-speed. As a vehicle driven often, it has to be the THM400 cars." Given your country location, I would check with your local auto transmission specialists about servicing a Hydramatic [just don't say it is on a R-R/B] and I will be very surprised if they advise they do not have a qualified person on this type of transmission. Obviously, this will change in years to come as the specialists retire but given the number of Hydramatics in collector cars from GM and R-R/B as well as other marques that might have used this transmission, I believe parts and service will be available in the years to come.

(Message edited by david_gore on 07 June 2007)
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Richard Treacy
Grand Master
Username: richard_treacy

Post Number: 1246
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Thursday, 07 June, 2007 - 17:11:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Interestingly, the automatic 1962 EK and 1963 EJ (we called them E-Type Js at school) Holdens have a 4-speed Hydramatic, but feel like a three speed. The first speed modulates with the second on starting off. That is because, unlike the R-R versions, they have no fluid flywheel. Believe it or not, they were made in France for Holden. For years, the Mercedes-Benz 4-speeds were built under licence based on the same transmissions. On the Mercs, they behaved as a 4-speed only if you floored them at the lights, normally starting in second.

The 1964 EH version is a true 3-speed. Then came the 2-speed Powerglide for some years from the 1965 HD onwards. Now that is special, with its wide-range torque converter. Rolls-Royce intended to use the Powerglide, but the THM400 was released and thwarted that decision. Two friends of mine had 1962 Chevy 289s with Powerglides, which we later both converted to 327s. 65mph in reverse gear was quite impressive. For some years, Sydney taxis converted from the Trimatic (traumatic) to Powerglides for reliability reasons on HQs and the like.

ps when the converter loses its torque multiplication on stall, the stator is freewheeling, not jammed. Its sprag clutch has collapsed.
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Glenn Amer
Experienced User
Username: recordo

Post Number: 27
Registered: 4-2005
Posted on Friday, 08 June, 2007 - 11:15:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

David, your comments about push starting reminded me of my 1968 Humber Series VA Super Snipe. At a petrol station late one night about ten years ago the starter motor disintegrated...bits fell out from under the car. Finally a tow truck arrived and the car was dumped on my mechanic's doorstep to be discovered in the morning. He said to me "Isn't it great you can push start these automatics". Didn't I feel like a dill...(think it was a Borg Warner transmission). And the valve radio in my 1955 Super Snipe Mark 4 would always drain the battery, I became adept at roll starting it in reverse...(reverse because of my driveway)

back to the topic. Wish I had never read this post because now I am getting nervous at an expensive transmission repair for my Shadow!

(Message edited by recordo on 08 June 2007)
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David Gore
Moderator
Username: david_gore

Post Number: 728
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Friday, 08 June, 2007 - 14:49:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Hi Glenn,

I would not be too concerned provided you keep the oil levels correct and change the oil regularly. Also helps if you have the band adjustments on the 4 speed checked at the first sign of a hesitant/slurred gear change.

You are in the fortunate position of having easy access to Neville Vassalo in the unlikely event you have problems - I have no hesitation in recommending him based on the experience of fellow club members.
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Paul Yorke
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Username: paul_yorke

Post Number: 51
Registered: 6-2006
Posted on Friday, 08 June, 2007 - 19:24:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Glenn,

Don't worry. Both boxes are excellent and reliable, but one is more excellent than the other!

If you've got a 4 speed - don't panic! I think the Rolex / Swatch comparison is possibly a little dramatic but I can see where it's coming from!

I'd probably liken it to choosing between a Filet steak or a T-Bone. Neither one bad! The T-bone may look more tempting, but the filet will always be that little bit more enjoyable and better for you.
( Hope you're not a veggie ! )

As for Tow or bump starting - Don't be tempted to try it on your R-R or Bentley. With the power brakes not operating you will probbably end up in the back of the towing vehicle or at the bottom of the hill embedded in whatever object was there before your car squashed it!

Whatever your choice, enjoy it.
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Patrick Lockyer.
Grand Master
Username: pat_lockyer

Post Number: 727
Registered: 9-2004
Posted on Saturday, 09 June, 2007 - 06:30:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Come on chaps,the golden rule do a brake reserve system test on all SS1 SS2 cars once a week after use.
If ok and the car fails to start in the next few days the car can still be moved with the brakes still fully functional.
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Laurie Fox
Experienced User
Username: laurie_fox

Post Number: 30
Registered: 6-2004
Posted on Saturday, 09 June, 2007 - 08:33:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

I know it is a bit off topic but the recent posts about pushstarting have led to my recalling a situation some years ago when I was very glad indeed that the MK VI could be push started.

I was doing some consulting work in Italy, at Ivrea, having driven there from the UK as my wife and I often did in B420EY. We were in a very pleasant little hotel on the outskirts of the town and I needed to be, all day, at the working location which was in a converted monastery a few miles away up a small valley. No problems for several days, with the car generating a certain amount of interest as I drove through a few small villages.

Then one day there was a fairly heavy morning mist and it seemed sensible to put the headlights on. As I went up the valley the mist cleared and there was very bright sunlight. I parked the car in the car park and proceeded to the days work. But I was a bit late in finishing up and by the time I got back to the car park everyone else had gone. It was a lovely evening and I was looking forward to the drive back.

So, get in the car, set the controls, press the starter - nothing happened. Oh dear, the headlight switch was still on and battery was flat (and so was the car park). However, the interest in the car had prompted one or two children to come and have a look, so, instead of getting out the starting handle and seeing whether there was enough in the battery to raise a spark, I asked the children, in my very poor Italian, if they could get some of their friends and give me a push. The response was immense, large numbers of ten and eleven year olds suddenly appeared. I managed to tell them that if they could push at the back while I was in the driving seat then all might be well. I reckoned that if I were to be going at 4 mph in second gear when I let the clutch in then even a small spark would probably do the trick, provided I switched on at the last moment. And so it proved. Once started, the dynamo cut in and the engine turned over at a fast tickover while I got out to congratulate the children and provide cash for ice cream all round.

But when I got out, all the children had gone! Why, I have no idea - it may have just been politeness (this was in the 1960's) or being shy. Anyhow, the drive back to the hotel was uneventful and the car was parked there on a slope in case there was trouble the next morning with a low battery.

Since then I have always made a particular point of switching the master switch to the off position when parking and not just turning the ignition switch off.

Regarding the other point, about low brake system pressure under various conditions, I am glad that the MK VI with the mechanical servo has none of these problems - the brakes are always there regardless. If I had a later car I am sure that it would have other features which I would enjoy just as much but if you like your car and it runs well, why change it. My wife and I (third custodians) have had B420EY as our only car for nearly 48 years.

Regards

Laurie

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Paul Yorke
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Username: paul_yorke

Post Number: 52
Registered: 6-2006
Posted on Saturday, 09 June, 2007 - 08:37:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Patrick,

You'd still have to be pretty brave(or foolish, IMHO)

Could you be sure nobody's pressed the brake in those few days, they didn't get pressed too often when the car wouldn't start and you were getting in and out and trying things. . . ..
or more importantly . . .. your foot wan't resting on it when making out with your girlfriend in that local lovers lane ! LOL.

Nope - I've seen enough Rolls-Royces with drivers doors taken off, bumpers squashed or owners with pale faces in need of underwear changes to say "Don't"

Two and a half tons of R-R - with no brakes - is no laughing matter. ( I know! )

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Richard Treacy
Grand Master
Username: richard_treacy

Post Number: 1249
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Saturday, 09 June, 2007 - 21:49:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

To be fair, Paul, all cars until 1974 do have a master cylinder, so at least half the rear braking is always fully functional, enough to stop the brute at low speed.

I often roll our T-Series backwards out of the garage down a slight slope unstarted to load it up. It always stops fine even when there is no pressure left after a long time parked.

However, your point is spot on. When I first bought my Turbo R I forgot that it has no master cylinder, and learned the hard way after a week at a holiday house. Not thinking as it so similar to the T, I tried the same on an incline. It rolled down the hill, missed my friend's car and a wall with a millimetre on each side, I had to do a full lock left into the street to avoid a 20M sheer drop, all with no power steering. Then a full right onto the highway, no traffic thank goodness. Pale face alright ! Only then did the shock recede enough that I thought to hit the parking brake. Phew.

I have roll-started my R-Type with its Hydramatic for fun a few times, but it doesn't like it. As it reaches about 15 MPH, it starts to whine for five seconds as the front band starts to engage then Bingo. It must be bad for the band. Much easier and safer is simply to use the crank handle !

So, if the Lucas starter on your 4-speed Hydramatic car after the R-Type falls apart, at least you have a chance to avoid flatbedding it home by roll-starting it with great care. Also, a Lucas starter usually gives months of complaining before it fails, so let's hope that roll-starting may be avoided. On our '72 T the original Lucas starter has never given a problem in 220,000 miles. If the less-reliable Nippondenso on a later car fails without warning as they do when the sprag disintegrates, it's a flatbed truck you call. Fortunately, the Nippondenso starter on the Turbo R collapsed at home after 155,000 miles or so, so I was able to change it on the spot but with lots of cursing.
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Paul Yorke
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Username: paul_yorke

Post Number: 53
Registered: 6-2006
Posted on Saturday, 09 June, 2007 - 22:29:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Richard, It is a not something you'd want to happen again, once they start rolling , there's no stopping them!

I still wouldn't RELY on either the parking brake or the master cylinder to stop a R-R, even my own one.

If anybody does find themselves in that situation and you do have battery power. Hold your foot on the brake and crank the engine. (It happens so quickly that I bet you wont remeber this tip at the time!)

I use this method to great effect on the rare customers who argue that their well expired accumulators aren't important and their "brakes are working fine thank you very much" .
I park the car on a slight and clear incline.
Tell the client to sit in the drivers seat with their foot on the brake.
Put it neutral
Turn off the engine.
Turn the Ignition on and be ready to start the engine.
Now release and put the brakes back on.
release and apply as necessary. ( sometimes as few as two times!)
Once the car starts rolling uncontrallably and the customer is suitably shocked I tell them to start the engine.
The car soon comes to a stop.

It may seem a bit harsh, but it does the trick!

Even furthur off the topic now : Another thing that I've never understood is why R-R (amongst other cars manufacturers) started fitting "self releasing" parking Brakes. Ok, they may stop the pads wearing down so quickly, but if somebody does accidentally flick it into gear, the last thing you want ,IMHO, is the parking brake releasing itself. Luckily it unclips easily for anybody else with that frame of mind.
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Richard Treacy
Grand Master
Username: richard_treacy

Post Number: 1253
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Sunday, 10 June, 2007 - 00:01:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Yip. You are absolutely correct on unexpected total brake loss. It all happens so quickly that you do what you can if you can. Your instructions are obviously correct, but we don't expect Boot Camp training to drive these cars ! If you slipped it to anything but Neutral, then it will not work, so I reckon that the SAS training should include using the parking brake, and also risking transmission damage by shifting into Park. I concentrated on steering the runaway monster, and needed both arms in overload to turn the steering around two right-angle curves and didn't think to jam the transmission into Park or anything else. 2 1/2 tonnes of car with 3 turns lock-to-lock and 255.55x17 tyres is pretty heavy work to turn. I certainly had no chance to turn the key while wrenching the steering wheel to full lock with no power assistance. I can't be sure whether I used the parking brake or started the motor as it was an absolutely frightening experience, but now you mention it, on recollection I seem to remember now that in fact I did start the motor, by then on the straight road.

As an aside to accumulators, I remember a crash I saw about 15 years ago in Sydney' Double Bay. A mechanically-neglected (but cosmetically pristine) 1975 Silver Shadow's motor stalled as it slowed for the traffic lights going down New South Head Road and it slammed into the back of another Silver Shadow. Luckily for him the insurance company accepted the police report of mechanical failure. The repairer told me that both accumulators were completely ruptured.

As to self-releasing parking brakes to save pad burnout, I agree it's madness (SZs from 30,000-series). Mind you, call me stupid but I never use the parking brake and rely solely on Park. The only use is at the vehicle testing station.
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bob UK
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Posted From: client-86-29-94-236.brig.adsl.tesco.net
Posted on Sunday, 10 June, 2007 - 01:05:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Many years ago I was shown a Jag XJ12 that had be doing 70MPH on the motorway when a dog jumped from the back seat and put the g/box in reverse.

The bell-housing broke where it meets the gear box. The gear box spun round ripped the crossmember up and battered the transmission tunnel.

My mate fixed the car and it drove perfect. He left the tunnel battered ( he's a mechanic not a body man )Fitted a recon box and some secondhand bits and bobs.

The owner was quite lucky.



(Message approved by david_gore)
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bob uk
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Posted From: client-81-108-191-14.brig.adsl.tesco.net
Posted on Friday, 08 June, 2007 - 21:23:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Tow or bump starting anything is not recommended.

Because the snatch loadings on the engine transmission etc can and do get damaged.

No autos now have a rear pump and no tow start.

I do not think the rear pump was fitted so that the car could be tow started I think it was fitted to supplement the front pump.

I think the deleteing of rear pumps was because of owners tow starting. Not just RRs but Jags etc.

Bearing in mind that a Jag with no servo is almost as bad as a RR with no engine runing



(Message approved by david_gore)
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bob UK
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Posted From: client-86-29-94-236.brig.adsl.tesco.net
Posted on Sunday, 10 June, 2007 - 00:55:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

I hardly use the parking brake.

On hills I always turn the front wheels so that should the car decide to roll away the front wheels hit the kurb and use the hand brake.

On flat surfaces gearbox in park never seen a car roll away.

Warning on SS1. The handbrake cable from the handle runs around a pulley on the bulkhead if too much slack is present the cable can come off the pulley in a loop and rest on the starter relay terminals -- the cable is a good earth.

The hand brake lever should come up half way and the return springs keep the cable tight.

One advantage the GM400 box has is that there is a range of upgrade kits that can be fitted.

I read somewhere that a co. in the USA is working on a convertor with lock up for the GM400. It comes with a different valve body.

Also the box is easy to overhaul and in the scope of a DIYer

The Shadow does not need another gear because the engine has enough torque and beside 120 mph at 4500 rpm is fast enough and the engine is still under-stressed.

My Jeep has a lock up which occurs at about 45mph I am sure that this contributes to the overhaul ecomnomy which is about 20 mpg and good all things considered.

Many years ago I had a 1966 Ford Transit ( LGY 703D ) The master cylinder was operated by a push rod which bent up when I stamped on the brake in an emergency. The van stopped but the brake pedal stayed near the floor so I pulled it up and pulled away with the intention of stopping a short way in a layby to check it out. When I got to the layby no brakes so on with the handbrake and lock the rear wheels up (10 mph) The push rod had snapped.

No one at Ford had ever seen this happen. Ever since then I always check brakes often. I know it is a chore but it has to be done.

(Message approved by david_gore)
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Glenn Amer
Experienced User
Username: recordo

Post Number: 30
Registered: 4-2005
Posted on Sunday, 29 July, 2007 - 09:18:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

I should never have said anything about my transmission. I had a wonderful long trip to Bowral and back the other day, stopping many times. When the car was idling outside my garage while I went to open the door, the car simply refused to go into 3 or 4, but it would go into reverse and 2! So at least I could get it into the garage. Thankfully page T18 of the manual says: "fault - car fails to move forward in range 3 or 4, but moves in range 2 or reverse". Cause: Centre clutch oil feed pipe blocked or badly leaking - remove side plate, etc etc...". So it might not be as bad as I thought. Fingers crossed. At least spares do seem to be available...I checked with Neville Vassallo and also this link:

http://www.autotran.us/hmkits1.html

Will keep you posted!