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Mujahid Khan
Experienced User
Username: anjumkha

Post Number: 9
Registered: 12-2003
Posted on Tuesday, 23 May, 2006 - 09:05:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

SSII 1977
Three questions re an old radiator:

1. What radiator will fit the old one.

2.What will happen to the transmission cooler which is embedded in the original radiator?

3.What is the modification to get rid of the header tank and convert to a more conventional system?

Best regards

M Khan
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David Gore
Moderator
Username: david_gore

Post Number: 574
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Tuesday, 23 May, 2006 - 10:57:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Hi Mujahid,

My responses to your questions would be:

1. See a local radiator/cooling system specialist about having your radiator fitted with a new core instead of replacing it. There are a wide range of core inserts available from radiator manufacturers and as you live in the "land of big engines"; I would expect a core size to be available that would fit the Shadow radiator assembly with no or minimal modifications to the top and bottom tanks.

2. The transmission inter-cooler in the bottom radiator tank is not affected by a recore. If it is removed by choice; you will have to fit an after-market transmission oil cooler with the attendant location, mounting and connection problems. Under no circumstances would I consider using the vehicle without a transmission oil cooler.

3. I was involved in the modification of a Shadow II radiator to take a standard pressure cap some years ago and it was a straight forward operation. The existing cap housing was de-soldered from the header tank and stored for future sale with the car, a suitable cap housing was salvaged from a conventional radiator and soldered on to the header tank. An overflow tank was connected to the pressure cap throat overflow outlet and a standard pressure cap with suction back-fill ability was fitted. The installation does not suit the purists but is a practical solution for a car to be driven on a frquent basis.

As an aside, we found the cooling fan and viscous coupling was also a problem in the Australian climate. We found a standard Ford Falcon viscous coupling that was a "bolt-on" replacement for the original coupling and fitted a Falcon plastic cooling fan with more blades and greater "bite" to increase the air flow through the radiator core. In both cases, there was no problem with clearances and mounting the replacement items. Again, the appearance is not standard but the benefits were considered more important than originality. As with the original cap/cap housing; the original parts were kept for future use by an owner concerned with originality.
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Mujahid Khan
Experienced User
Username: anjumkha

Post Number: 10
Registered: 12-2003
Posted on Tuesday, 23 May, 2006 - 14:43:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

David:

It is so nice to hear from you and thanks a lot for your kind response.

As for the car, I enjoy it and contiue to drive it frequently on long trips. Only recently I have come across some coolant loss, which was the result of a bad cap and some pin holes in the header tank.

I have fixed the cap and the holes. The coolant does not leak but I have also noticed that the temp gauge climbs around 85% range quickly once the car is in the city.( ambient temp around 77 degrees F).

I have also noticed air bubbles emnating from the overflow pipe, which I connected to a resevoir tank. My fear is: Is it the head gasket?

Please advice.

Best regards

M Khan
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Patrick Lockyer.
Grand Master
Username: pat_lockyer

Post Number: 568
Registered: 9-2004
Posted on Tuesday, 23 May, 2006 - 17:00:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Do a leak down test first.
If ok do flow test on the rad if not ok do a reverse flush of the rad.
If still not ok then more in due course.
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David Gore
Moderator
Username: david_gore

Post Number: 575
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Wednesday, 24 May, 2006 - 14:46:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Hi Mujahid,

The replacement viscous coupling and higher-rated fan was a direct response to overheating problems in stop-start city traffic to the extent the air-conditioning had to be turned off to keep the coolant temperature from getting too high. The end-result of the conversion was that the coolant temperature stayed almost constant with the air-conditioning on regardless of traffic conditions in ambient temperatures in excess of 100deg Fahrenheit.

Please follow Pat's advice and get a leak-down test on the radiator to see if it will hold pressure. If it does not hold pressure then check for hose/tap/core water leaks before assuming the head gasket is leaking. Bob-UK on the Swam forum mentioned a proprietary product that can be added to the coolant to react with any combustion products that get past the head gasket and give a visual indication of a leaking gasket but this was deleted when Kees cleaned up the recent bout of spamming on this site. Unfortunately, I have not had any exposure to this type of product to comment further.

I would not be surprised that as the coolant comes back to room temperature after use, it creates a vacuum which sucks air into the system most likely through the overflow connection. Next time you start the car and warm up the engine, the coolant expands pushing the air out of the system through the same overflow that allowed it to enter the system. If this is the case, you should not see a continuous stream of bubbles once the engine has reached normal operating temperature and stabilised or after being driven for 15/20 mins unless, of course, the coolant is boiling but you would certainly be aware of boiling from the associated sounds. If the bubbling is only at start-up and is not continuous afterwards then I doubt if there is a head gasket problem [Murphy's Laws apply to this bold opinion!!].

Another Shadow quirk to be solved .
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Mujahid Khan
Experienced User
Username: anjumkha

Post Number: 11
Registered: 12-2003
Posted on Wednesday, 24 May, 2006 - 23:20:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

David:
Thanks so much for the advice. I am sad that the Swam site is out. However, in my case the Aussie site has always been helpful.

I assume that you have another Shadow now.

M Khan
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David Gore
Moderator
Username: david_gore

Post Number: 576
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Thursday, 25 May, 2006 - 12:50:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Hi Mujahid,

Have sent you a private message through this forum - if you do not receive it; would you please contact me using the UTILITIES/CONTACT/David Gore facility on the LHS of the Forum Page.

Kind regards David
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David Gore
Moderator
Username: david_gore

Post Number: 577
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Friday, 26 May, 2006 - 16:29:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Hi Mujahid,

I received your message and have replied both direct from my personal address and through the forum reply system.

Kind regards David
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bob uk
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 80.3.64.11
Posted on Tuesday, 30 May, 2006 - 03:41:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

David.

In the UK we routinely use a kit which takes a sample of the coolant water and checks it for exhaust gases.

SP tools do one, so do Sealey.

I am sure if you were to ask your local tool man he would know more.

I am also sure that any local main agent --Ford or whatever --would have the equipment.

It is literally a 30 second job.

I do not touch head gaskets until this test is done.Except where the water is being pumped out by starter motor -- never mind running the engine.

The cap on my car is hard plastic. IT does nothing except "plug the hole" if these are expensive it would not require much work or skill to make one on a lathe ( with a leadscrew) out of aluminium.

304 stainless would be nice. I keep a pile of this stuff under the lathe at work.

My criuse control buttons broke so made some 304 ones which look good. Differcult to polish stainless.

The radiator core is a standard size which is listed in the rad repairers parts book.

The sizes are in inches and rows -- rows being the thickness.

If in doubt it is worth taking the rad to the repairer and get him/her to leak test and flow test. MY man does this free of charge because it takes seconds to check.

I have rads recored at the drop of a hat because they do wear out.

(Message approved by david_gore)
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David Gore
Moderator
Username: david_gore

Post Number: 582
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Tuesday, 30 May, 2006 - 13:58:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Hi Bob,

Will check availability of test kits next time I am in town as my 4WD diesel has a well-known characteristic of cracking the head between the inlet and exhaust valves.

If you still have my email address, please contact me direct so I can send you some information on surface finishing your stainless steel cruise control buttons to bring them up to original standard. I am certain you will have access to the equipment needed to do this. If you do not have my email address, please telephone Pat and he will be able to give it to you. I only have your old hotmail address from the Swam era on file.

Kind regards David
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bob uk
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 80.3.64.11
Posted on Friday, 02 June, 2006 - 05:08:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

I still use the old hotmail address.

Another stainless steel I use is MONAL K500 this stuff is very tough and even harder to polish. Some of the parts I make have a 0.8 (SI) finish and if we get a bad finish it takes a lot of work to get it to 0.8 bearing in mind the surface will have a 0.015mm tolerance as well to consider.

The criuse control buttons were easy to make I just copied them exactly from the plastic ones.

To polish the ends I fitted a new ceramic tip and run at 2000 rpm take a couple thou off with the tool bang on centre height. Then 800 grit and machine oil. ( you can't put a rad shell in a lathe)

Incidently a tip for DIY turners. It is very important that the tool is bang on centre height. The machine dials will not be accurate otherwise. Inc a digital read out if fitted. Also if screw cutting or form cutting the shape will differ from the the shape of the tool.Also if the tool is seriously too low then the tool can under run and rip the job out of the chuck, which will damage the chuck and they are not cheap ( a new chuck for one machine cost 2000 + )

I do this with every lathe I use. Put a bit of scrap in the chuck and face it off as the tool gets to the centre check with a magnifing glass, and adjust as necessary. Once the tool is bang on make a setting tool that goes from the bed to the top of the tip.

Some of the bits I make may require 10 different types of tools and the setting gauge speeds work up.

(Message approved by david_gore)
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David Gore
Moderator
Username: david_gore

Post Number: 583
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Saturday, 03 June, 2006 - 12:51:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Hi Bob,

Now you are really bringing back memories especially the references to the Monel range of alloys [Pedant's Corner: these are not "stainless steels" as they use nickel instead of iron as the base metal]. Monel K500 is a really versatile alloy as it is hardenable using a simple low-temperature process and has good corrosion resistance in marine and oil refinery applications especially for propellor and pump shafts. As Bob has mentioned, the machinability of these materials is such that the skill and craftsmanship of the lathe operator is critical in achieving the best finish - C.N.C. automatic lathes cannot match the sensitive touch of a craftsman.

Bob, will try and email you - the address I have is surnameX where X is a number. I understand Pat may have emailed my address to you as well.

Kind regards
David