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Jean-Pierre 'JP' Hilbert
Experienced User
Username: jphilbert

Post Number: 32
Registered: 9-2013
Posted on Sunday, 18 January, 2015 - 10:13 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

I managed to brake the fuel line a few inches before the fuel filter.
I figured out that the line is 8mm steel, and that the flare is a single, 45 degree. The spanners necessary to remove the lines are also metric. Am I right so far?
My idea is to cut away the broken stub, make a new flare to the original line, then add a few inches of new line. For this, I need to source a male-female-male connector between the end of the old line and the new one.
My questions:
- is such a repair roadworthy or must the whole line be replaced?
- is 8mm steel ''flareable'' in situ by normal hand tools?
- are there other accepted repairs?
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Lluís Gimeno-Fabra
Grand Master
Username: lluís

Post Number: 325
Registered: 8-2007
Posted on Sunday, 18 January, 2015 - 05:27 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

It's fuelling woes days in the forum?

I am sorry i cannot help you but good luck.
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Jean-Pierre 'JP' Hilbert
Experienced User
Username: jphilbert

Post Number: 33
Registered: 9-2013
Posted on Sunday, 18 January, 2015 - 07:17 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Thanks Lluis!
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Bob UK
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, 19 January, 2015 - 09:13 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Depending upon fuel injection or carbs.

5/16 or 8 mm copper will flare easy. Heat end of pipe to dull red and quench in water. This makes the copper soft.Then using a ball brg say 1/2 dia tap this with s hammer to flair. It's fiddly. To hold pipe get two bits of 2x4 screw together with a piece of cardboard between them, then drill through the joint with a drill the same size as the pipe. Then remove card this will clamp the pipe when the screws are tightened. Save for future use.

Then fit to union and nip up this will make the flair bed down.

If carbs then this is suction
To join new bit use approved fuel hose and SS hose clips.

If feul injection then this pipe might not be suction but pressure at Max 75psi. If it's pressure then go to autobox specialist for a coupling and olives.

If the pipe is suction that is between the tank and pump, fix as for carbs.

Using small hacksaw cut the broken bit back and file burrs off.


Copper of this size has a burst pressure well over 300 psi.

This will get you mobile but ultimately the whole pipe(s) from front to back should be changed.

Once you have got the "flair" for flairing buy copper pipe and do the whole lot. £30 for pipe.

This size is a very handy size so keep left overs for other jobs.
The transmission cooler pipes can be made like this.

Copper lasts years and years probably over 100. Also it solders easy to brass unions.and gives a gas tight joint. The rule of thumb is 3 times the pipe dia for the hole length. The hole should be approx 5 thou bigger than the pipe. This is for the solder. These joints are surprisingly strong and I have seen 1500 psi for over an hour before the pipe failed not the solder. This type of joint works well with fuel injection and similar.


Incidently because it's cold domestic Water pipes can freeze and burst. A repairable quick repair is to close the burst with the round bit of mole grips. Then tin the area, then wrap with copper wire and solder the whole lot. Use a worm drive clip to hold one end of copper wire to pipe then wind one layer neatly tight together. Smear the whole lot in flux paste before soldering. To make real nice looking job. While the solder is still fluid wipe with a rag.

(Message approved by david_gore)
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Jean-Pierre 'JP' Hilbert
Experienced User
Username: jphilbert

Post Number: 34
Registered: 9-2013
Posted on Tuesday, 20 January, 2015 - 08:29 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Bob, well copied, thanks indeed. A simple press fitting did the job, pic attached. Local MOT happy with that solution.

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Bob UK
Unregistered guest
Posted on Tuesday, 20 January, 2015 - 09:22 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

That's similar to the ones used for joining transmission oil cooler pipes.

These are great for fitting while the pipe is on the car.

Proper job.

MOT testers are swayed easily when they see a quality repair because they subconsciously think that any other repairs are done to a good standard. Where as a lash up with a bit of rubbish plastic pipe would set the tone for a very good look at the rest.

I used to do trade mots. And one trader continually brought in rubbish cars and fitted used parts. I used a fine tooth comb when testing. The new owner will question the mot when he realises what he brought.

I have seen numerous botched fuel system repairs and it's so dangerous.

Those little olives can be fitted to pipes and soldered on. This gives a ridge for the fuel hose to slip over. Then clamp behind the olive. The hose won't then slide off.

Domestic 15mm copper pipe doesn't fit 16mm garden hose, it tends to leak
Solder a olive or a straight Yorkshire fitting on the pipe. A hose clip will now seal the joint. I use this idea to connect my caravan to the water main. Saves on using the very slow electric pump. Also because the pipe is outside when it freezes, the garden hose tends to expand rather than copper which will burst. That's how the original copper burst.

Note in hot weather the water inside the pipe will be less than wholesome, so always run the water for a minute or so to flush.

Note also that car heater hose is 16mm. 15mm copper works well on cars, it can have brackets solder on. I have a long bending spring so I can bend the pipe to the same as the rusted out steel on. For the old car look copper can be polished, for a more modern look gloss black. Undercoat is unnecessary.



I think you have now figured out pipework. It's all easy, and not expensive, can be fiddly and time consuming though. And it's just as time consuming in a shop which will be reflected the invoice.

(Message approved by david_gore)
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Jean-Pierre 'JP' Hilbert
Experienced User
Username: jphilbert

Post Number: 35
Registered: 9-2013
Posted on Wednesday, 21 January, 2015 - 08:44 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Thanks for being on my side, Bob!
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richard george yeaman
Prolific User
Username: richyrich

Post Number: 251
Registered: 4-2012
Posted on Wednesday, 21 January, 2015 - 09:34 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Jean-Pierre I will second that, This forum benefits a lot from the efforts of Bob UK I really don't know how he gets the time or the energy keep up the good work Bob.

Richard.

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