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Geoff Wootton
Prolific User
Username: dounraey

Post Number: 125
Registered: 5-2012
Posted on Sunday, 17 March, 2013 - 03:20 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Is it possible to remove the indentations on my wheel cover, arrowed in the photo below.

wheel cover

I am thinking of using a planishing hammer and the anvil on my vice to flatten these indentations out. Is this a really bad idea?? Am I likely to make matter worse by trying this.

Geoff
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Nigel Johnson
Prolific User
Username: nigel_johnson

Post Number: 114
Registered: 12-2008
Posted on Sunday, 17 March, 2013 - 07:42 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Hi Geoff, I would use piece of softwood for the anvil and a poyprop hammer or shaped plastic drift. Don't let anything metallic near them.
Regards, Nigel.
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Kevin Lagden
Frequent User
Username: kevin

Post Number: 76
Registered: 7-2009
Posted on Sunday, 17 March, 2013 - 08:09 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

If they are from trying to get the covers off, next time run a cloth between the vents, in one and out the other and just pull, they come off a treat and no damage
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David Gore
Moderator
Username: david_gore

Post Number: 1251
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Sunday, 17 March, 2013 - 08:32 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Geoff, the trims are most likely 300 series austenitic stainless steel; this material has a strong tendency to "spring back" when cold-worked and has to be gently "over-bent" when removing dings such as yours for the material to return to its original profile.

The force needed is relatively high depending on the gauge of material used for the trims. Do not use hammers for this process unless you are highly-skilled in keeping the hammer face parallel to the work to avoid the side of the face leaving more indentations on the trim. I would use a "C" clamp with a piece of suitably sized softwood [thickness approximately depth of the indentation + 10%] to match the width - 10% of the indentation under the screw face to apply force and use an anvil made from a piece of softwood with a suitably-sized hole cut with a spade bit to match the width + 10% approx of the indentation on the frame face of the clamp. The metal face of the screw must not contact the trim during pressing as it could leave an indentation.

Just align the trim in the clamp using the timber pressure pad and anvil and gently tighten the clamp until you can just see the pressure pad sink below the surface of the surrounding trim. Release the clamp and use a straight-edge to check the alignment. Repeat as necessary applying small increments of depression from either side as appropriate until you are happy with the alignment. Do not overlook the fact that compression of the timber components will also occur during this process and this also has to be compensated for by increased compression from the screw during the flattening process.

Patience will be a virtue to get the desired outcome - finesse rather than brute force has to be the guiding principle.
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Geoff Wootton
Prolific User
Username: dounraey

Post Number: 126
Registered: 5-2012
Posted on Sunday, 17 March, 2013 - 08:57 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Many thanks for all the advice. I should add that these indentations were made by a previous owner or tire shop. I would never lever against the rim of a wheel cover. However, I will try out the "cloth" method of removing the cover for future use.

David - Many thanks for taking the time out to give that detailed explanation. I will be using this method.

I'm so glad I asked this question - the lump hammer can stay in it's rack.

Geoff.

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