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Colin Silver
Experienced User
Username: colsilver

Post Number: 12
Registered: 8-2008
Posted on Monday, 29 December, 2008 - 04:23 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

I've done my search through threads on this forum and not found a discussion on Cloud I thermostats.

I don't have one installed but definately want one. A search of Crewes website comes up with nothing, so there may not be one available anywhere. I doubt anyone has tooled one for only 2300 odd Cloud I's (unless they fit other cars)

To help in a quick warm up I use a blind that is manually pulled up to cover the front of the radiator - with an up and down cord running through to under the dash. (I love my father's ingenuity)

I don't want to pull things apart until I have a thermostat to put in.

I bet, like the Cloud III thread, I'll be getting a thermostat's circumference lathed.

The workshop manual gives these measurements:
The valve has a minimum stroke of 0.275 in. and is 1.310 in. in diameter. The bore of the coolant passage in the main body of the thermostat i s 1.251 in. in diameter.

I don't want to go for a Trident brand (web littered with sad tales)

Dayco Australia http://www.dayco.com.au/products.aspx?G=1784&P=1517
have a listing of thermostats but their 3 pages leave me confused on what to buy - if at all.

So, converting the workshop manual's imperial measurements, I get :

Minimum stroke of 0.275 inch = 9.985 mm
Diameter of 1.310 inch = 33.274 mm
Bore of coolant passage of 1.251 inch = 31.7754 mm

Given this is the Southern hemisphere, I'm taking the manual's guide for a 'Summer' thermostat
ie: it should open b/w 75 and 77 deg Celsius and close at 96 deg Celsius.

My summary is I need a thermostat with following specs:
- 33.274 mm for diameter
- 9.985 mm for height
- 76 deg C for opening
- 96 deg C for closing
Any opinions on my Summary?

Any ideas on where I can get a thermostat to fit?

I think my girl deserves at least a $100- to keep her on the correct heat required.
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Bob Livermore
New User
Username: livermoreb

Post Number: 8
Registered: 5-2007
Posted on Tuesday, 30 December, 2008 - 02:11 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Colin

Are you sure about the diameter? 33mm sounds very narrow and is only just wider that the bore of the coolant passage. I have looked at the manual and this is the diameter of the valve but the body will be a bit bigger than this,

Flying spares do a thermostat for either £115 or £160 depending on type (plus 15% tax and postage). Introcar do one for £160 (++). Their site has a photo at http://www.introcar.co.uk/acatalog/INTROCAR_THERMOSTATS_2624.html. I have a couple of gaskets for your car and the hole in them is about 54mm - 2 1/8 inches, which is probably nearer the size you want. A Quinton Hazell QTH101K from an Alfa Giulia would probably do if that is the case.

I can send you the gaskets if you want them - although they are only about £1 each from Introcar.

Bob Livermore
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Colin Silver
Experienced User
Username: colsilver

Post Number: 14
Registered: 8-2008
Posted on Tuesday, 30 December, 2008 - 02:04 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Hi Bob. Am I sure about the diameter? No. The workshop manual's description of the housing, valve and thermostat is confusing for me.

Whatever, you have now given me some links I didn't find. Wow, AUD335- + 15% VAT for a thermostat. Still, that is the price to have someone stock a slow moving item. I might have to bite and get it. Beats paying for a motor rebuild before its time.

I've now found that there is a thermostat in my girl, but was jammed opened 20 years ago to prevent overheating. Very slack.

Thank for the offer on the gasket. No need at present. I'll sit on this for a few months.

Also thinking of hiding a couple of thermo fans to help the girl in heavy traffic and mountain climbs. She doesn't like it, despite a new radiator core.

The introcar URL you gave me shows distinctly different thermostats for my Cloud I (SC1) than the other which is for 2's and 3's. Is your reference to the Quinton Hazell meant for the SC1?

Thanks again Bob.

Colin
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Bill Coburn
Moderator
Username: bill_coburn

Post Number: 1060
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Tuesday, 30 December, 2008 - 07:04 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Colin, The Introcar pic is not good but they are extremely reputable and reasonable. Note that to get the old one out you will probably need to smash it by drilling and cold chislings as they simply corrode into the housing.

Frankly I am tired of reading of whether this thermostat or that will fit. The one pictured is designed for the car and that's that. It is unique in design. The thermostat as Richard among others has explained ad nauseum, has to shut off the radiator during warm up and then shut off the bypass at operating temperature.

Can I ask that this, if, what about and I wonder whether, can stop. The only other car that uses this thermostat as far as I know is the Armstrong Siddeley 3 litre Whitley and derivatives. But they stopped making those 50 years ago. If you want a thermostat for those cars you go to RR!!!!

Sell your body, your booze, raid a bank - just go buy one!
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Brian Crump
Experienced User
Username: brian_crump

Post Number: 34
Registered: 2-2007
Posted on Tuesday, 30 December, 2008 - 07:58 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

You bloody beauty Bill!!! A friend of mine has being hankering for a new thermostat for the A-S and now I know where she can get one.
Regards,
Brian
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Bill Coburn
Moderator
Username: bill_coburn

Post Number: 1062
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Wednesday, 31 December, 2008 - 06:51 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Brian/ It's a bit nostalgic. I remember when the parent company stopped production of the Siddeley - the last model was the Star Sapphire a rather elegant and well fittted vehicle. They also made a limousine version (sounds better than a 'stretched' version doesn't it)and somehow the High Court club of the day managed to convince the then Government to supply one of these extended cars to each emminence! I believe at some grand function in Canberra they each and everyone turned up in their own car. The procession was admirable. I do not know whether they travelled in ermine robes and wig which would have been interesting if it was Summer - the only air conditioning Armstrong Siddeley ever enjoyed was the universal WD80 system!

I digress, at the time of the car's demise the announcement was made that parts would continue to be made for ten years which actually happened. Things are a bit slim now but you can still get water for the radiator!

I mention this as a reminder that the 'new' owners of our passion at least publically, to my knowledge, have never issued such a limit yet the harbingers and carpers still mutter in their covens about the evil conquest and the four wheel usurper of the Badge!!!
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Colin Silver
Experienced User
Username: colsilver

Post Number: 17
Registered: 8-2008
Posted on Wednesday, 31 December, 2008 - 12:03 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Bill says: Note that to get the old one out you will probably need to smash it by drilling and cold chislings as they simply corrode into the housing.

I'll make old man come out of retirement to watch me dig it out.

Sell
your body

I'd only be good as a 'bear' in the gay community

your booze
I have still - for battery top up purposes only :-),


- just go buy one!
Ok, Ok, I am convinced.
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Bill Coburn
Moderator
Username: bill_coburn

Post Number: 1063
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Wednesday, 31 December, 2008 - 03:45 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP



Bill says: Note that to get the old one out you will probably need to smash it by drilling and cold chislings as they simply corrode into the housing.

I'll make old man come out of retirement to watch me dig it out.

They used to have a dinky little straddle puller that sat over the thermostat with the legs on the outer housing. The few times I tried to use one my nerve failed before it did. In any case the old one is of no use. You will see where to drill around the carcas to weaken it then use a small cold chisel and hammer to knock the outer frame of the thermostat inward breaking its grip on the main casting. Don't forget to locate the location screw that Richard mentioned. There is a slot in the side of the new thermostat that will drop neatly over the tip of the screw unless it has either corroded away or been broken off. It should not be too much bother to replace it.
Sell
your body
I'd only be good as a 'bear' in the gay community

There's a market there I am sure as to the rate I can't help!

your booze

I have still - for battery top up purposes only :-),


- just go buy one!
Ok, Ok, I am convinced.

Peace at last!

BBC
}
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Richard Treacy
Grand Master
Username: richard_treacy

Post Number: 1544
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Thursday, 01 January, 2009 - 05:40 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

On a similar thermo thread on this Forum I was asked:

--I'll have some of what you're drinking please!!--

Now it's my turn to beg. It's snowing outside, and rather dry inside 80 minutes before new year strikes. Is the off-licence open on New Year's Eve ?

Happy new year all. Keep those wheels a' rolling.

RT.
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Laurie Fox
Experienced User
Username: laurie_fox

Post Number: 46
Registered: 6-2004
Posted on Thursday, 01 January, 2009 - 06:59 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

The thermostat in my MK VI is fairly easy to remove after a slight modification which is worth while doing if your thermostat is like mine.

Originally there were two blind 3BA holes in the top to take the extractor screws but the extractor screws never went in far enough to get a good grip. Drill and tap 2BA right through (there is plenty of metal and good clearance underneath). Make up a bridge piece long enough to span the thermostat housing and bolt it to the thermostat body. Use 2BA bolts long enough to connect to all the threads in the thermostat body leaving a small gap between the bridge piece and the thermostat housing so that you can lever the thermostat body up with a couple of screwdrivers to start with.

When refitting you can block up the 2BA holes if you want to but I don't bother.

Regards

Laurie





(Message edited by laurie_fox on 01 January 2009)
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Richard Treacy
Grand Master
Username: richard_treacy

Post Number: 1546
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Thursday, 01 January, 2009 - 07:28 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Just a comment, which is prompted by Laurie's excellent pictures.

The thermostat valve opens upwards on the MkVI-S1 thermostat as it heats up.

Note that the top surface of the bellows on Laurie's thermostat blocks up the bypass route when the thermostat opens Upwards.

The Silver Shadow thermostat opens Downwards, with its equivalent disc at the bottom lowering to block the aperture at the bottom of the housing.

ps I have never had any of the rare 3BA screws or nuts, but always had 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 etc. Instead I have always blind-tapped the thermostat to the larger 2BA almost as Laurie prescribes. Drilling and tapping right through would have save me headache many times. Darn.

As an kick to do it properly in future, and to reduce knuckle-bruising, Stephe recently gave me via Jonas a wonderful set of BA taps and dies in an incredible 1950s wooden fold-out box!!.
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David Gore
Moderator
Username: david_gore

Post Number: 858
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Thursday, 01 January, 2009 - 02:15 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

The following links may be of interest to Australian members wishing to acquire BA tap and die sets in the range 0-10BA and larger if required -they also have large ranges of steel and brass BA fasteners including grub and cap screws:

MiniTECH - Brendale Qld.

www.minitech.com.au

Model Engineering Supplies - Tullamarine Vic.

www.mesupplies.com.au

Prices for carbon steel tap and die sets range from around AUD130 to AUD300 depending on contents.

Usual disclaimers apply - these suppliers advertise in "Australian Model Engineer". Overseas members should refer to Model Engineering magazines published in their countries for local suppliers - BA threads are widely used in model engineering.
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Colin Silver
Experienced User
Username: colsilver

Post Number: 18
Registered: 8-2008
Posted on Thursday, 01 January, 2009 - 04:36 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Hello All

First, top info from Laurie, Richard and David, but is this to do with a Silver Cloud I?

After Bill put his foot down and is forcing me to buy an Introcar Silver Cloud I thermostat, Laurie comes on and his text splats the minimialist RR brain portion I posess.

Should I ignore the MK VI posts of Laurie, Richard and David, because that thermostat is not from my girl? Or is it the same? I doubt as mine has 4 bolts.

In fact, just last week was the first time in 35 years any of my cars was worked on by a mechanic. Given the price I was charged, I will be going back to my own maintenance and repairs.

I'm not a goose to thermostat replacements, doing highway removals and making gaskets from cardboard, but those fixes weren't on a Rolls Royce or Bentley.

Working on my girl scares me and I'm already accused by my wife and sons of being close to neurotic.

Help me Bill.
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Richard Treacy
Grand Master
Username: richard_treacy

Post Number: 1547
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Thursday, 01 January, 2009 - 10:38 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

It's the same thermostat.
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Richard Treacy
Grand Master
Username: richard_treacy

Post Number: 1549
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Thursday, 01 January, 2009 - 11:58 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Perhaps that was a bit too abrupt.

Itís the same RH9143 thermostat for MkVI, R-Type and S1 for a start. Also, the consumable housing cap UE2640 and gasket are the same for that matter.

See the parts manuals and bulletins, or even Introcarís listings for example on:

http://www.introcar.com/acatalog/INTROCAR_THERMOSTATS_2624.html

and

http://www.introcar.com/acatalog/INTROCAR_THERMOSTATS_2744.html

Introcar's list price is £160, and their X suffix shows it to pe a pattern component. Flying Spares offer pattern thermostats at £115 and genuine (claimed) at £160. I would be surprised if they are not all pattern components in any case, so I would suggest that the cheaper Flying Spares offering be checked for full compatibility before buying.

The final price you pay will depend upon your personal discount rate with your preferred supplier (loyalty helps !).

As an exercise, try buying a selection of unique parts for a 1956 Maserati or Jaguar off the shelf, and check the prices if you dare. You will see instantly how incredibly well served we are by the UK R-R/B outfits compared to any other make of car on earth. We can buy practically any part for our cars off the shelf at a very reasonable price, and can instantly refer to parts and workshop manuals free online.

Cripes, we can even buy pistons ex-stock for these and most other R-R/B cars direct from JP Pistons in South Australia for that matter, as they are the global manufacturer and supplier. That is truly amazing.

We all love a bargain, but I do suggest it unfair to compare Rolls-Royce and Bentley parts prices to those of more recent mass-produced cars. Where the price reflects quality and uniqueness, simple comparisons must surely be irrelevant. Our cars have always been the most, or among the most, expensive cars sold ever, especially as series production models. As they say, you canít drink vintage Champagne on a beer budget.

RT.
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Laurie Fox
Experienced User
Username: laurie_fox

Post Number: 47
Registered: 6-2004
Posted on Friday, 02 January, 2009 - 02:47 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Just two comments in relation to the thermostat environment.

1 The thermostat cover (water connection) is secured to the thermostat housing by four 1/4 in BSF bolts When installed much of the threaded ends of these bolts are exposed and corrode. Removing them can damage the threads in the thermostat housing. Better to replace the bolts with studs with nuts on top.




2. The water connection is a small aluminum casting (UE2640) which seems prone to corrosion and needs changing from time to time.. Luckily I still have spares bought some time ago at what now seems to be a bargain price. They were £1.41 each in 1974 from Jack Barclay. You can still get them from Introcar but the price is quite a bit more (£124.59 +VAT). Not unreasonable when you think of what is involved in making a small batch of slow moving parts from scratch and keeping them available for a long time.

Regards

Laurie
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Colin Silver
Experienced User
Username: colsilver

Post Number: 20
Registered: 8-2008
Posted on Friday, 02 January, 2009 - 02:12 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

I've found some pictures of RH9143 at Flying Spares. Clicking either of the three of them gives a good detail. I am now realising Bill's disgust of looking for $20- Autobarn replacements and using a lathe.

http://www.brabocars.com/cs_parts_details.php?partno=RH9143
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Colin Silver
Experienced User
Username: colsilver

Post Number: 21
Registered: 8-2008
Posted on Friday, 02 January, 2009 - 02:28 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Excellent advice you've been giving Laurie. Love the pictures too. All the info from you blokes should equip me with answers if things go amiss in the replacement.

I know I can, I wish I can, I know I can........
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Richard Treacy
Grand Master
Username: richard_treacy

Post Number: 1550
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Friday, 02 January, 2009 - 10:04 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Interesting is that you have shown Brabo pictures. Compare the Brabo catalogue and prices to those of Introcar across the board, and you may make up your own mind as to their principal, if not sole, source. I have had a brief encounter with Brabo. Their handling of a technical enquiry over the compatibility of an important and very expensive component bears no comment. To them, I was just a stupid jerk in Switzerland. They may be correct about that, but they don't seem to understand that our R-R&B community is rather close knit.

It may be of interest that Yorks sent us a revised type of S3 thermostat for the R-Type around 1972. They told us that it superseded the bellows type.

It was supplied by the then Rolls-Rolls Motor Cars plc. It sure seemed to fit, and the bypass was in the right place, but I returned it for a bellows type for good measure anyhow as the V8s run at a higher controlled temperature than do the 6s. Also, the MkVI-S1 types have the temperature bulb far lower and directly in the coolant flow, whereas the S2-S3 have a shallower housing, although the bulb is still in the coolant path at the bypass, needing the shorter thermostat to fit. It operated by a swivelling flap like on many generic types, but had an extended right-angled lip on the flap to close the bypass duct. I wish I had kept it. It was a flimsier type than the original ones and than those shown in catalogues today, not unlike the pressed-metal type in a Holden or Ford. Bill may remember these. It had a wax pellet, as do all the replacement MkVI-S3 ones commissioned for manufacture by Introcar today, but the S2-S3 ones are rather shorter than the MkVI-S1 types as shown in the parts manuals and catalogue pictures.

Given that todayís S3 offerings are priced at 50% more than the MkVI-S1 types, although they may do the job on MkVI-S1 cars, itís barely worth a try.

RT.
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Colin Silver
Experienced User
Username: colsilver

Post Number: 23
Registered: 8-2008
Posted on Saturday, 03 January, 2009 - 03:01 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP


quote:

Richard said:
Interesting is that you have shown Brabo pictures



Yes, I accidently introduced Introcar and then posted Brabo links. I blame it on the home brew. Sorry.

My main point was that I'd found detailed pictures, where as Introcar show a small picture. I couldn't post the pictures here for copyright reasons.

quote:

Richard said: Given that todayís S3 offerings are priced at 50% more than the MkVI-S1 types, although they may do the job on MkVI-S1 cars, itís barely worth a try.




Confused here or am reading your post incorrectly. I've interpreted it you are saying that the Brabo pics I linked to are not an S1, but are S3 thermostats.

Part Number RH9143 is an S1 thermostat to my knowledge.

More I get into this, the more I know I will be selling my wife and getting Chapman & Co do it all.
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Richard Treacy
Grand Master
Username: richard_treacy

Post Number: 1555
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Saturday, 03 January, 2009 - 09:38 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

You may care to read the thread on SCIII thermostats running in parallel with this one, and the point in this thread that R-R seemed, at one time at least, to try to standardise on the S2-S3 type for MkVI-S3 cars. Given that the S2-S3 type is more expensive, I suggest it not even be worth pursuing for now.
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David Hughes
Experienced User
Username: wedcar

Post Number: 23
Registered: 7-2004
Posted on Monday, 05 January, 2009 - 10:54 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Gentlemen
Further to this, I recently fully rebuilt the 6 cylinder engine on our Silver Cloud. Amongst other things, the block and head water jackets were fully cleaned (doors and plugs removed) the brass water rail adjusted as per KDA132 advice, new radiator core and new CORRECT original thermostat. The engine now runs at the correct temperature even on a 35 degrees Sydney day with the air conditioning system running. My advice - use the correct thermostat!
Regards
David Hughes
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Colin Silver
Experienced User
Username: colsilver

Post Number: 27
Registered: 8-2008
Posted on Wednesday, 07 January, 2009 - 06:07 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

David Hughes said : The engine now runs at the correct temperature even on a 35 degrees Sydney day with the air conditioning system running. My advice - use the correct thermostat!

I've only cold up to hot on my temp gauge, but am striving to achieve a 1/2 to 2/3 needle point after seeing the needle too high on non desert days.

After the thermostat change and "sshhhh" a hidden thermo fan when I'm stuck in slow moving traffic - a mix of Penrite's Classic Car Coolant, I hope to be where you are it.

If not, I've some muck yet to be found in the system. If so, it will be off to a reliable radiator crowd one of my client's uses for supplying muscle car cores.
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Colin Silver
Frequent User
Username: colsilver

Post Number: 84
Registered: 8-2008
Posted on Thursday, 17 September, 2009 - 07:14 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

As I said in the Smoking Cloud thread Bill started, I'd answer the questions about the pulley I was asking about. I was just wondering if it was worth buying.

I started this thread in Jan, but still haven't removed the forced open thermostat. Warmer weather is here, so I must do something.

I know the best solution is to let our local Royce/Bentley specialist do everything as I can get the engine pressure flushed at the same time. The car can then be looked over thoroughly too for impending problems.

But I still have a near 4 decade mentality of repairing my own cars (due to money - not passion). Yet I am scared to touch the Cloud.

Somehow I will beat the problem.

Anyway, theoretically, what's the opinion on this thermostat pulley.

I reckon it would only be worth buying if you replaced thermostats before they got too stubborn - as my 20 plus year jammed open one would be.

Reading over this thread again - wow was I green only 9 months ago. Bill's Tee One PDFs and the good arguments in this forum are helping me lots. There is also Dad's notes that he meticioulsyly kept. Pity he's not keen on talking about his 20 years on the car.

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David Gore
Moderator
Username: david_gore

Post Number: 907
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Thursday, 17 September, 2009 - 10:32 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Colin,

You have been confusing us all - one picture is worth a thousand words.

You kept referring to a pulley when you really meant a puller - one letter makes a big difference.
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Colin Silver
Frequent User
Username: colsilver

Post Number: 88
Registered: 8-2008
Posted on Thursday, 17 September, 2009 - 12:31 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Being a narcissist, I blame all of you. How can a thermostat have a pulley? Geesh

When I think back, I've always called a puller a pulley and no-one has ever 'pulled' me up on it.

Now, on topic, is this thermostat PULLER a tool I should get for the tool kit? }

Maybe it will allow a good but stuck thermostat to be removed for testing. I don't know how hard a good thermostat is to get out.
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Paul Yorke
Grand Master
Username: paul_yorke

Post Number: 419
Registered: 6-2006
Posted on Friday, 18 September, 2009 - 10:18 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Colin , we all knew you meant Puller, but thought it was cute.

From about the age of four, My daughter called a grave yard a 'gravy yard'. It always made us smile and we never corrected her.

All was lovely until at about age 16 she came home from a school trip, and when we asked how it went, she moodily just replied 'fine'. (anybody dealing with teenagers will know that sort of reply.)

She then said they visited 'one of those places that they bury people . . . .you know'

A cemetery? I suggested.

'No - with graves in'

Errr A Grave Yard? I asked.

' YES - a GRAVE yard. NOT a bloomin *GRAVY* yard - How could you be so mean, you must hate me!' and stormed off. :-(

Whoops, LOL.

But anyway, I'm not sure if a 'stuck thermostat' and a 'good one' will ever be the same thing.

How much will you pay for a puller, to try and take out a 'suspect' thermostat? Would that money be better spent buying a new thermostat instead.

The original puller screws into the brass thermostat, so any really stubborn ones will not be forthcoming. I've heard people drill through and put nuts on the bottom. Haven't tried myself.

Shame you're not closer - I would have rented you one of mine :-(

Good luck. Paul.
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Laurie Fox
Frequent User
Username: laurie_fox

Post Number: 64
Registered: 6-2004
Posted on Friday, 18 September, 2009 - 11:12 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

My thermostat (MK VI) is pictured earlier in this topic and is, I believe, the same as that on S1's. It was difficult to remove the first time I did it, many years ago, but when putting it back I always made sure that it dropped into the housing with a bit of clearance between the brass body and the thermostat pocket. Clean up the thermostat pocket sides without letting any debris get into the coolant circuit and trim up the thermostat with a file. Be sparing with any jointing compound you use on the gasket. The jointing compound does tend to get into the gap between top of the thermostat and the housing but you can get it out with the blade of a small sharp knife before you start the next removal.

Like any awkward stripping down job it is always worth thinking, when you put things back again, if there is anything which could be done to improve things or make it easier next time. This is why I replaced the bolts with studs as also illustrated above. I am well aware that the picture does not show the outside of the thermostat pocket to be in concours condition but (maybe regrettably) this does not worry me. B420EY is a working car and I see no point in cleaning up things like this where there is no functional betterment. Some things do pay for keeping clean and this is done regularly - the insulators on the plugs, for example.

Regards

Laurie
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Bill Coburn
Moderator
Username: bill_coburn

Post Number: 1169
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Friday, 18 September, 2009 - 11:36 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Colin/ Paul took the words out of my mouth. When thermostats fail that's it. There is no repair etc. If the thing is not opening it will show in the header tank as it will if it stays open. I have never used a puller to get one out for all the reasons sofar stated. I simply drill and drill (it is only brass) and eventually a firm twist of the screw driver and out it comes.

It is most important as Richard has said that the new one goes in the right way, normally forced on you by the little steel locating screw accessable from the outside of the housing. If the correct coolant has not been used the screw will corrode. It can easily be replaced.

As I said ages ago Colin, bite the bullet, hack the old thing out, put the family on the street and buy a new one!
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KC Saayman
Prolific User
Username: kc_saayman

Post Number: 101
Registered: 10-2004
Posted on Sunday, 27 September, 2009 - 05:01 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

I have just had to hack to old thermostat out of my S1 project. The thing was corroded solid in place. It was also stuck in the open position, so replacement was imminent, and there was no good reason for trying to save the old thermostat.

I made my own puller, much cruder, but fairly similar to the unit illustrated above. The top, moving part of the thermostat can be screwed off in situ, which exposes the solid brass upper ring section. I constructed a puller with two large bolt heads that ďhookĒ into this solid brass ring and pulled the thing out that way. It was so stuck that the little bolt holes would never have given enough grip to pull it out. Surprisingly this crude method did not destroy the thermostat as I had expected it would. (I can dig out a picture of it if you promise not to laugh at my engineering attempts)

Something I learned a long time ago on my Mk VI is to put a thin layer of copper grease on the thermostat sides when installing it. Now every time I service my cooling system the thermostat pops out with almost no effort at all.

Regards

KC
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Colin Silver
Frequent User
Username: colsilver

Post Number: 96
Registered: 8-2008
Posted on Wednesday, 30 September, 2009 - 05:08 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

I didn't realise this thread was answered to - after my last post. Thanks to all contributors.

The fear of working on Hilda still exists; despite 34 years never having a vehicle of mine fixed by anyone but me - from timing to engine and manual gearbox rebuilds.

Iíve reworked my financial plans and will finance

1/ therapy for fearing Hilda

2/ getting Hildaís thermostat fixed, serviced and a thorough mechanical report.
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Colin Silver
Prolific User
Username: colsilver

Post Number: 104
Registered: 8-2008
Posted on Tuesday, 01 December, 2009 - 01:57 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Yay, I bit the bullet and today Hilda was delivered for her bladder valve change, along with important things I've thought up.

Many pats on back please.

Bill, if I find the thermostat was an easy lift out, I'm sending my sons over to have a talk about scaremongering innocent new owners.
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Colin Silver
Prolific User
Username: colsilver

Post Number: 132
Registered: 8-2008
Posted on Thursday, 29 September, 2011 - 08:56 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Hilda had a full work over by Chapmans. Overall, my old man had been keeping the car quite well for the last 25 years.

Thermostat was replaced with a non Rolls design. Thermo fan put on. Blah, I like original, but at least I can revert if I want to go Kosher.

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