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Donald Maloid
New User
Username: prodmgr

Post Number: 10
Registered: 9-2007
Posted on Wednesday, 16 July, 2008 - 06:32 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

I was just wondering, has anyone ever converted the original braking system of an S2 Bentley to a late model version of todays cars? If so, how is it done?
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Paul Yorke
Prolific User
Username: paul_yorke

Post Number: 174
Registered: 6-2006
Posted on Wednesday, 16 July, 2008 - 06:41 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

People have, they usually look terrible.

Vacuum servos mounted in odd places.

What did you want to change, and why?
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Donald Maloid
Experienced User
Username: prodmgr

Post Number: 11
Registered: 9-2007
Posted on Wednesday, 16 July, 2008 - 08:24 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

I wanted to simplify the braking system so serviceing can be a breeze to maintain.
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Paul Yorke
Prolific User
Username: paul_yorke

Post Number: 175
Registered: 6-2006
Posted on Wednesday, 16 July, 2008 - 08:52 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Servicing it , once it's working correctly, should only involve:

Removing the drums and de-dusting.
Adjusting the rear brake adjuster occasionally.
Making sure the servo seal is not leaking.
Keeping everything well lubricated and rust free.

The key is don't go playing with the rods and adjustments. Ensure it gets Routine maintainance and it will be simple.

Just because it looks complicated, doesn't mean it's not simple to maintain.

Good luck with yours :-)
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Paul Yorke
Prolific User
Username: paul_yorke

Post Number: 176
Registered: 6-2006
Posted on Wednesday, 16 July, 2008 - 08:59 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

This may be what you were hoping for though :-)

http://www.gwautos.com/gwa2.swf
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Donald Maloid
Experienced User
Username: prodmgr

Post Number: 12
Registered: 9-2007
Posted on Wednesday, 16 July, 2008 - 09:20 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

I will keep that in-mind and maitain what exist. One thing thought, do Bentleys of this size stop agressively or slowly when brakes are applied? Mine stops slowly -what could it be?
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Paul Yorke
Prolific User
Username: paul_yorke

Post Number: 177
Registered: 6-2006
Posted on Wednesday, 16 July, 2008 - 06:49 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

If you need to press the brake pedal very hard , then it is most likely to be oil on the brake servo. This is a clutch that operates the master cylinder.

If this needs re-lining, you will need to change the seals at the same time.

There is plenty written about these on here I'm sure.

Regards, Paul
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Paul Yorke
Prolific User
Username: paul_yorke

Post Number: 202
Registered: 6-2006
Posted on Thursday, 14 August, 2008 - 09:19 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Here is a conversion . . . YIKES!
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Paul Yorke
Prolific User
Username: paul_yorke

Post Number: 203
Registered: 6-2006
Posted on Thursday, 14 August, 2008 - 09:23 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

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Bill Coburn
Moderator
Username: bill_coburn

Post Number: 1003
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Thursday, 14 August, 2008 - 10:03 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Here is a possibly offensive contribution! Many many years ago there was some clever fellow in Victoria that had a late twenties Hupmobile. They were a fine strong car and although not prolific they were not a rarity. This fellow managed to insert a very powerful engine into the chassis and upgraded the brakes and steering commensurately and used to terrorise the police on the national highway. Those days there was no speed limit on the open roads. He would take great pleasure in overtaking police cars at very high speeds and generally demoralising other motorists in their pride and joy. I think that was all good fun and probably the destruction of a car, otherwise motive and ingenuity were rewarded.

There is a growing tendency in these and similar columns specialising in the marque for owners to be seeking advice on the best polish for the bumper overriders and whether the veneers need some special attention. This is all well and good except that there is a haunting suspicion that while the exquisite veneers glow from within the car the brake lines are rotting underneath it! So often we listen to owners apparently in love with the marque, having great debates on the selection of colours of the car without any reference to its condition.

Now we are having people wanting to make fundamental changes to the mechanical specifications of the car. Why are they doing this? If they are not, for God knows reason why, happy with the braking performance or they want a smoother transmission, why bother with the car. The conclusion I believe is that they like being seen puncing around behind that lady. Most would agree that while it may happen to other strange people who we see driving by at a distance, they are the last type of person one would wish to have to mix with, at least that is my perception. In short I plead for cars to be kept as original as practical and if they have to be modified it should be when there is no other practical alternative. The last situation of course covers the demise of the vee eight which if neglected will cost much in excess of the worth of the car to repair. There are some excellent American vee eights and I am told a Lexus vee eight which practically drops in as the saying goes!
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David Gore
Moderator
Username: david_gore

Post Number: 831
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Thursday, 14 August, 2008 - 10:48 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Words failed me when I saw the photograph - Heath Robinson would be proud of the work.

"In short I plead for cars to be kept as original as practical and if they have to be modified it should be when there is no other practical alternative. The last situation of course covers the demise of the vee eight which if neglected will cost much in excess of the worth of the car to repair. There are some excellent American vee eights and I am told a Lexus vee eight which practically drops in as the saying goes!"

I think there will be a big enough market in the future for someone to take on the casting of replacement V8 engine blocks given the fact that it is still being used in current Bentley production. It is now the second longest engine with
continuous use in the world after the GM "small block" V8.
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Bill Coburn
Moderator
Username: bill_coburn

Post Number: 1004
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Thursday, 14 August, 2008 - 11:44 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

We would hope David. You may not be aware that three years ago Bentley ordered 10 blocks for 6230 cc engines from a caster. It was a case of finding someone who was prepared to make such a small number. That agreed the price then was $30,000 each. As of early this year I understand that main bearing saddles were still to be made separately. Blocks aside, new pistons bearings etc etc today total up to at least $20K and if youhave to pay someone to do it - well!!! The good news I am hearing is that new welding techniques are able to repair virtually any operational damage to our blocks which is a relief given the number of Spirit blocks turning up these days split from head to toe!
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Paul Yorke
Prolific User
Username: paul_yorke

Post Number: 204
Registered: 6-2006
Posted on Friday, 15 August, 2008 - 03:49 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Bill, Here is a possibly offensive contribution!

I should have titled mine : here is a definitely offensive contribution.

I couldn't believe it when I saw it!! Thankfully the owner wants to try and put it back to original. I haven't had a chance to look underneath yet.

This was the low point on a surprise find of about 12 Cloud I & II's. and 8 Silver Wraiths, all LWB LHD with Division.
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David Gore
Moderator
Username: david_gore

Post Number: 832
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Friday, 15 August, 2008 - 11:33 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Bill,

The split block problem is a competent welder's delight and an opportunity to demonstrate their skills.

The real problem "children" are the blocks which have corroded internally due to owner neglect - I wish I could devise and patent a technique to electrochemically rebuild the internal corroded areas using the available access points.

The cost problem was due to the small number of castings ordered - would be interested in what the price would be for an order of 100 blocks or more by a third party not carrying the R-R/B name.

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