Fuel Tank Removal Log Out | Topics | Search
Moderators | Register | Edit Profile

Australian RR Forums » Silver Cloud & Bentley S » Fuel Tank Removal « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Richard Greene
Frequent User
Username: benzjag

Post Number: 59
Registered: 12-2012
Posted on Wednesday, 09 August, 2017 - 06:58 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

I need to remove the fuel tank on my 61 Cloud. The fuel is 7 years old, and there is varnish in the tank. If there is any other way to clean the tank without removal, I would be delighted! I read the factory manual instructions, but they were not clear (at least to me). Is the tank removed from below the car? Where exactly is the tank?

Also, I need to know about the sender. It is stuck? Can it be cleaned or rebuilt?

Any help or suggestions are extremely appreciated. I apologize for perhaps elementary questions, but I am learning about the Cloud.

Richard
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

David Balfour
Frequent User
Username: sidchrome

Post Number: 75
Registered: 2-2009
Posted on Wednesday, 09 August, 2017 - 09:29 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Hi Richard,
The service manual

http://rrtechnical.info/sc/sc1/wshop/10.pdf

explains how to do this in a step by step basis. I would, if possible resist removing the tank, as it can be a rather frustrating job to refit. The waxes/varnishes are often soluble in acetone/GP thinners. i wonder if putting a few litres/gallons would suffice? and then draining it out, flushing with petrol also. It is however difficult to get non-soluble debris/dirt off the bottom of the tank without removing/swirling, and tipping it up. The tank is somewhat a beautiful work of engineering that would be perfectly at home on an aircraft. The complexity of baffles and the quality of construction are hust not found on mass produced cars. Is almost worth removing to appreciate the quality.

The big headache on installation is around re-attachment of the rubber filler neck. The tank needs to go in without the rubber neck. With the top of the filler tube removed, by removing all the screws at the fuel cap, the the rubber hose can be inserted onto the tank neck from above, and the large clamp tightened from below, but the hoses tend to collapse on themselves. I managed to overcome this issue, by winding a section of plated coat hangar wire into a purpose made spring that was just a little larger than the neck. The wire ends were turned toward the centre to prevent damage to the rubber, and the whole spring was twisted into the rubber filler hose. This prevents the hose from collapsing into itself, but doesn't prevent it from being bent at any angle. This will give you the rigidity you need to slide it on.

I did my whole job on the garage floor with some decent stands, but it would be much easier to remove and install on a hoist. Don't be tempted to re-install the tank with the filler hose already fitted, you will kink it for sure if you can even get it on. Also, there s a vent hose which attaches to the top of the tank to allow the vapour to escape as the tank is filled with fuel. This was not clamped on mine. I replaced this hose with a new one, and clamped it at the tank. The other end was passed through the hole in the boot floor and I left as much free hose as practical before trimming and attaching to the filler neck.

Note that unlike mine when I pulled it apart, the vent hole needs to go to the top of the filler neck, otherwise the venting vapour will blow back and splash the fuel out as you attempt to fill the car at the bowser. May I add that accessing the sender unit is easy while the tank is out, and because the exhaust is so close to the sender I recommend sealing the sender well before tank installation. Mine leaked upon re-installation, and I didn't even remove the sender. just the stress of undoing the electrical connections was enough to break the seal. In my case tightening the screws eventually stifled the flow, but it is something I still monitor. Good luck!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Richard Greene
Frequent User
Username: benzjag

Post Number: 60
Registered: 12-2012
Posted on Wednesday, 09 August, 2017 - 02:36 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

David,

Sincerely appreciate the tremendous details!

When getting the old gas out, it was definitely a dark wine color and had a terrible odor that you could smell everywhere. Oddly, I did not see one speck of rust or anything else. I am thinking now that maybe it will not have to come out. If not, would I have to fill the entire tank with the acetone? Any suggestions valued.

My fuel gauge needle is at 1/2 full with a empty tank. Could the acetone "unstick" it?
If not, can the float be removed withOUT removing the tank?

Thanks!

Richard
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

David Balfour
Frequent User
Username: sidchrome

Post Number: 76
Registered: 2-2009
Posted on Wednesday, 09 August, 2017 - 09:56 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Hi Richard, as I mentioned above things are awkward around the sender when the tank is installed. I suspect you will be able to remove the sender unit nuts, but I don't know if it is possible to remove the arm and float without destroying something. It is probably prudent to remove the tank, do a clean out, and attend to the sender while it is accessible. I would not introduce acetone to try and "unstick" the sender. I'm sure it's fine to dissolve any waxes/varnish in the bottom part of the tank, but effect on the sender, I just cannot say. You are not likely to find any rust in the tank either, as it is made from aluminium. Why not follow the detail in the manual and test the sender and gauge without removing anything so that you don't waste time and energy removing something that is maybe OK. I suspect if there is an issue with the sender that the tank will need to come out.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

David Balfour
Frequent User
Username: sidchrome

Post Number: 77
Registered: 2-2009
Posted on Wednesday, 09 August, 2017 - 09:59 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Further thought, filling the tank and driving the car may unstick the sender if it is indeed stuck- maybe.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Richard Greene
Frequent User
Username: benzjag

Post Number: 61
Registered: 12-2012
Posted on Friday, 11 August, 2017 - 02:34 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

David,

I let the fuel pump dump out the stale fuel. I added Seaform additive and Heet water removal with 8 gallons of fresh 95 octane fuel. I replaced the main filter and added another before the pump. In result, the car is running much much better. It is almost as smooth as my Shadow II. I am thinking the tank will not need removing. The sender is still stuck. I am hoping in time it will clear as well. Appreciate all your help!

Richard

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Bold text Italics Underline Create a hyperlink Insert a clipart image

Username: Posting Information:
This is a public posting area. Enter your username and password if you have an account. Otherwise, enter your full name as your username and leave the password blank. Your e-mail address is optional.
Please quote Chassis Numbers for all vehicles mentioned.
Password:
E-mail:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action: