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Mark Aldridge
Prolific User
Username: mark_aldridge

Post Number: 166
Registered: 10-2008
Posted on Thursday, 06 November, 2014 - 05:10 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

EP90 is near impossible to get in the UK, 80w/90 being the substitute. BMC listed 85W /140 as a substitute back in the 1970,s for EP90. I notice that this is being made by Penrite , Lucas and others and is easily available in the UK. Would this better suit the S1 axle ? Advice please.
Mark
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Paul Yorke
Grand Master
Username: paul_yorke

Post Number: 1304
Registered: 6-2006
Posted on Thursday, 06 November, 2014 - 08:23 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Hi Mark, 80/90 is fine although EP90 is readily available.

If your local motor factors haven't got it . .. .

http://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_trksid=p2050601.m570.l1311.R1.TR4.TRC1.A0.H1.Xep90&_nkw=ep90+gear+oil&_sacat=0
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Mark Aldridge
Prolific User
Username: mark_aldridge

Post Number: 167
Registered: 10-2008
Posted on Thursday, 06 November, 2014 - 08:43 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Thanks Paul, I will buy on line. The factors here only sell GL4 or GL5 80/90 now and my EP90 stock has run out; and the manufacturers they stock don't do EP 90. 80/90 seems thinner than EP90, and the axle has covered 170 k miles, although I change the oil annually.
Mark
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Paul Yorke
Grand Master
Username: paul_yorke

Post Number: 1305
Registered: 6-2006
Posted on Thursday, 06 November, 2014 - 09:07 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Loving that you love your car and wallet enough to change the diff oil, let alone annually!

Such a neglected fluid. You would not believe the amount of cars that come in that must never have had the oil changed.

Often it is so bad that it seems more like a liver dispenser. :-(
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Mark Aldridge
Prolific User
Username: mark_aldridge

Post Number: 168
Registered: 10-2008
Posted on Thursday, 06 November, 2014 - 10:24 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Paul , Oil is cheap, Rebuilds certainly aren't ! Also , a post mortem on the drain tray is a warning of impending doom. The oil drained from my 5 yr old Landrover diffs recently was filthy and there is no specified change interval. Still I suppose it sells diffs.
Mark
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Bob uk
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 94.197.122.75
Posted on Thursday, 06 November, 2014 - 10:57 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

80w/90 is about the same as 90. The 80 bit gave a easier gear change when cold. Castrol 8090 is synthetic and not expensive. Lasts for many miles. How ever in little used cars.... Condensation.....

I always feel pleased with myself after I have changed a oil. It's like a ritual laying of the spanners. While the spanners are out check the breather thingy and maybe the brake back plate drains.

(Message approved by david_gore)
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Jeff Young
Prolific User
Username: jeyjey

Post Number: 206
Registered: 10-2010
Posted on Thursday, 06 November, 2014 - 07:54 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

I change my T2 diff oil every 4 years; my Land Rover Series IIa every 5 (both diffs plus gearbox and transfer case). Neither do over 1000 miles a year, but Ireland is pretty humid.

I use 80w/90. I suppose 85w/140 might be useful down under or in the Middle East, but I can't imagine it making any difference in the British isles.

Cheers,
Jeff.
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Bob uk
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 94.197.122.83
Posted on Friday, 07 November, 2014 - 06:26 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

The humidity today 6/11/2014 in Dorset UK is 80%. So I should imagine that Eire is about the same wet and damp and 10c. Which is rusty weather.

My jeep has an friction modifier additive for the lsd in the rear axle which lasts 3 years so I have to change at 3 years.

Also the axles and gear box breathers are connected with plastic pipes to higher up.

I use 80/90 in the axles and transfer box. And in the shadow diff and half shaft thingys. Every 3 to 4 years I change on both cars. The old stuff I use on the fence or for lighting bon fires or anti rust duties. 5 litres does both cars.

To light bon fires I use a steel tray rags and newspaper in a large cardboard box light the fire and then pile the garden rubbish on top.

(Message approved by david_gore)
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David Gore
Moderator
Username: david_gore

Post Number: 1481
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Friday, 07 November, 2014 - 11:41 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

"Also the axles and gear box breathers are connected with plastic pipes to higher up."

This is common on 4WD vehicles to vent the hot gearbox, differential and axle housings when entering deep water crossings. The sudden cooling of the hot casings and internal oil can create a partial vacuum which sucks water past the seals to the future detriment of the internal components. Locating the breather above the high water mark minimises this problem.
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Jonas TRACHSEL
Frequent User
Username: jonas_trachsel

Post Number: 54
Registered: 2-2005
Posted on Saturday, 08 November, 2014 - 01:47 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Quote:
To light bon fires I use a steel tray rags and newspaper in a large cardboard box light the fire and then pile the garden rubbish on top.

This is forbidden here and you would get fined, especially if the smother harrasses your neighbour.
Jonas, Switzerland
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Bob uk
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 94.197.122.93
Posted on Saturday, 08 November, 2014 - 06:08 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

In the UK bonfires are legal unless the fire causes a problem such as smoke across a main road. A neighbour can complain to the local environmental officer. If the environmental officer decides that the fire is causing problems then the officer will ask one to put the fire out. If the owner of the bonfire refuses then the officer can get a court order. Providing the owner obeys the officer and or the court then one does not get fined.
I have two burn up per year only . Which I consider reasonable.

(Message approved by david_gore)
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Paul Yorke
Grand Master
Username: paul_yorke

Post Number: 1306
Registered: 6-2006
Posted on Saturday, 08 November, 2014 - 07:23 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Bob lives in England.

People are so polite that you could light a bonfire every month and the neighbours will not complain.

In fact you could probably burn their mother on it without them complaining. Lol

Carry on . . . As long as their dog or their classic car isn't been harmed! :-)
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Jan Forrest
Grand Master
Username: got_one

Post Number: 691
Registered: 1-2008
Posted on Saturday, 08 November, 2014 - 09:44 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Up until last week I was having a contained garden fire nearly every evening. I was mostly getting rid of a load of aged timber, but there was a considerable quantity of plastic 10-20 litre drums. My back garden is pretty well covered from all directions by trees, garages and the house, but even so I would wait until dusk to light the fires. A mixture of waste veg oil and diesel was often used to help things along.
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Mark Aldridge
Prolific User
Username: mark_aldridge

Post Number: 169
Registered: 10-2008
Posted on Sunday, 09 November, 2014 - 04:07 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

With domestic refuse tips (recycling centres) within easy reach of all households, the necessity for bonfires completely escapes me.Bonfires have been the bain of our life this year during summer evenings when we have had to close all windows to escape the stench.Besides, the entertainment value of a tip run in the Spirit makes the exercise worthwhile !
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Paul Yorke
Grand Master
Username: paul_yorke

Post Number: 1307
Registered: 6-2006
Posted on Sunday, 09 November, 2014 - 04:48 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

If it's grown then fair enough.
But plastics ???
Take them to be recycled. If not for your neighbours sake . . For the sake of the planet. :-( :-(
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Bob uk
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 94.197.122.71
Posted on Sunday, 09 November, 2014 - 06:18 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Abspolitely right Mr Yorke sir. I only burn stuff that has grown. Burning plastics will contaminate the ground. My bonfires leave sterile ground and ash which is soon covered in green stuff.
My bonfires are hot which keeps smoke to a minimum and very quickly consumes the garden rubbish.
Everything else is sorted into recycle bins.

In the UK we try to take the sensible route. If bonfires were banned entirely then it would create unnecessary road miles. We have a recycle centre that takes green stuff and the pile is huge with very large trucks moving it.

The plastics worry me because I remember as a kid how much less plastic stuff was around. Then stuff came wrapped in paper wwhich if just thrown in the road would decompose to nothing. I have found plastic mars bar wrappers that are years old.

(Message approved by david_gore)
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Mark Aldridge
Prolific User
Username: mark_aldridge

Post Number: 170
Registered: 10-2008
Posted on Sunday, 09 November, 2014 - 08:10 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Bob which is the greater emission, a modern low emission diesel, or a bonfire with no particulate filter, ad blue or exhaust gas recirc ? In this area we have a garden rubbish collection with the bins, much as you put out, no limit, gets rid of all we produce in 1/3 acre.
The local tip also takes oil, batteries, antifreeze and plastic, so disposal of servicing rubbish is nota problem .
Mark
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Jan Forrest
Grand Master
Username: got_one

Post Number: 693
Registered: 1-2008
Posted on Sunday, 09 November, 2014 - 09:29 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

My garden rubbish bin is the same size as my 'dust'bin. Both are collected fortnightly on alternate Mondays. Most of my garden rubbish goes into my compost bin, as do any shreddings of personal papers. Only wood goes in the bin, but even compacted down there isn't much room.

Fortunately a closed fire melts more plastic than it burns, so the ash bin under it ends up with a thick layer of solid plastic in the bottom. A few sharp taps (Oh all right, I belt merry hell out of it) and the slug drops into the bottom of my main bin. Sorted.

As I may have mentioned before; most car oils - perhaps not 80W90 or similar - can be used as fuel in older style diesel engines. Sadly my motor home doesn't like it as it's fitted with a Perkins DI engine even though it's an '85 model. At times it runs like a WWII warship (make smoke and turn to face the enemy).
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Bob uk
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 94.197.122.74
Posted on Sunday, 09 November, 2014 - 09:21 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Unfortunately I am limited to one small bin per fortnight and the lid must close. If I could just put all 2 tons out for collection I would because the fire has to be watched etc. Our council took a bin away from outside the shops because of overuse.
A bonfire does emit particulates and gases but the comparison to diesel maybe apples and oranges.

I don't know enough about it to venture much of an opinion.

(Message approved by david_gore)
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Jean-Pierre 'JP' Hilbert
Experienced User
Username: jphilbert

Post Number: 18
Registered: 9-2013
Posted on Sunday, 23 November, 2014 - 03:37 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Paul, what makes you think that 80w90 is a good substitute for EP90? I always thought that 80w90 is NOT suitable for hypoid gears?
Am I missing/mixing something?

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