Converting Oil Bath filter to Paper a... Log Out | Topics | Search
Moderators | Register | Edit Profile

Australian RR Forums » Early Post-War » Converting Oil Bath filter to Paper air filter « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Martin Cutler
Experienced User
Username: martin_cutler

Post Number: 22
Registered: 7-2007
Posted on Saturday, 19 January, 2008 - 14:52:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Higuys,

I just had to completely remove the oil bath filter from B319LH just to get to the starter reduction gear to oil it, what a pain. The reduction gear should be a bit quieter now. With the back of the air box now dissassembled, I would like to swap it over to non oil bath type. When you turn the air box around to fit the air filter at the front, the holes don't line up, any body done this? Before I start drilling and making up brackets, any suggestions? I have changed B256MD from the original wire mesh type of non oil bath filter, to a Ryco A44 paper air filter, fits really well.

Cheers

Marty
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Martin Cutler
Experienced User
Username: martin_cutler

Post Number: 23
Registered: 7-2007
Posted on Saturday, 19 January, 2008 - 15:34:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Ok, you can't put the filter at the front using the oil bath type silencer. If I put it at the back, will there be any adverse effects? Will the air be hotter? Seeing that the oil bath filter draws air from right over the exhaust manifold, I don't think it would make much of a difference, it might even be better. Would cold air intake make a difference?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Richard Treacy
Grand Master
Username: richard_treacy

Post Number: 1341
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Saturday, 19 January, 2008 - 22:42:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Why on earth change the oil bath filter ? It is far superior to the alternatives, and was specially designed for dusty environments. You are fortunate to have an oil bath air filter. I can remove the entire assembly in about 2 minutes on my R-Type in any case, only required when adjusting the tappets or removing the cylinder head. Topping up the starter gears is a simple 6 monthly routine. Furthermore, any air filter change requires the carburettors to have revised needles fitted: LB, SC, SF, SJ, SE, SP or another with an experimental air filter. Then it will need a dynotune and exhaust gas analysis to sort out the problems. Don't go there.

RT.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Martin Cutler
Experienced User
Username: martin_cutler

Post Number: 24
Registered: 7-2007
Posted on Monday, 21 January, 2008 - 07:26:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Hi Richard,

Good point, but I can't help thinking, if oil bath filters are so good, why don't any of the current manufacturers offer this set up. I converted the oil bath filter on my MG Magnette to a uni filter washable filter, still fits inside the same housing. I was never sure if the oil bath filter was actually doing anything.

I will take your advice and replace the oil bath.

Marty
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Peter Colwell
Frequent User
Username: peter_colwell

Post Number: 60
Registered: 3-2005
Posted on Wednesday, 23 January, 2008 - 05:03:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

A major reason that modern engines routinely maintain top condition for huge mileages, is the vastly better air filtration systems used today.

The best are the centrifugal type used on heavy earthmovers and trucks, like Caterpillar. Donaldson Cyclopac. They use a combination of centrifugal force and fine paper element in series.

Cars in reasonably clean environment don't need such heavy-duty cleaners, but it is a fact that much of the dust that causes severe ring wear, is invisible.

I learnt this the hard way many years ago. A truck with paper system had operated for years in perfect condition, using almost no oil. Then one of the rubber hoses split, out of sight, and within a thousand miles the engine virtually wore out, in terms of becoming an oil guzzler. The piston rings just wore out in no time from the very fine dust that was entering unbeknown. The effect was a dramatic demonstration of the importance of clean air.

Caterpillar make the statement that with clean air, and clean oil, an engine's life is effectively indefinite in terms of physical wear.

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Bold text Italics Underline Create a hyperlink Insert a clipart image

Username: Posting Information:
This is a public posting area. Enter your username and password if you have an account. Otherwise, enter your full name as your username and leave the password blank. Your e-mail address is optional.
Please quote Chassis Numbers for all vehicles mentioned.
Password:
E-mail:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action: