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Robert Noel Reddington
Grand Master
Username: bob_uk

Post Number: 1467
Registered: 5-2015
Posted on Saturday, 01 July, 2017 - 05:48 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

I have decided that I will get a motorbike.

Speaking to a motor bike dealer, he said----

Recently PCP finance has been heavily promoted as a way of getting a new bike. These bikes are on a 3 year deal which when expired require a final payment to keep the bike.

He predicts the prices of used stuff are going to take a nose dive.
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Omar M. Shams
Grand Master
Username: omar

Post Number: 1241
Registered: 4-2009
Posted on Sunday, 02 July, 2017 - 02:59 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Hey Bob - I thought you said that a bike is not worth the potential hip fracture that could then ruin your quality of life.

Mate - I love bikes - I have 9 beauties here at home that I dont ride.... all because of the potential consequences.
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Robert Noel Reddington
Grand Master
Username: bob_uk

Post Number: 1469
Registered: 5-2015
Posted on Sunday, 02 July, 2017 - 05:53 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

I know!

I want to have a bit of adventure.

After lots of checking and a test ride I have chosen the Suzuki SV650 with abs and traction control. 74bhp 70 ftlbs and 170 kgs. 90 degree v twin. The engine has mid range grunt that will show the sports bike up.

The bike felt part of me and its traffic manners are very good. At 75mph it felt surefooted with excellent brakes. the performance is not that fast but faster bikes tend to draw you in to go to prison speeds.

I will have to wait for a used one to turn up because the earlier ones have no abs or TC.

The sales guy followed me on the test and said I rode fine. Well he would, wouldn't he.

its takes restraint to avoid accidents and not to go too fast.

What bikes do you have?
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Omar M. Shams
Grand Master
Username: omar

Post Number: 1243
Registered: 4-2009
Posted on Sunday, 02 July, 2017 - 05:58 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Dera Bob,
I have 2 Kawasaki Z900s, 2 Honda GL1000s, 2 Suzuki GS1000s, a Yamaha XS1100 , a Honda CRM250 and a Kawasaki KH400.
I love the 70s bikes although I did also enjoy an 80s Moto Guzzi V65SP and a BMW R65 in their days.

Good luck with your new bike.
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Robert Noel Reddington
Grand Master
Username: bob_uk

Post Number: 1470
Registered: 5-2015
Posted on Sunday, 02 July, 2017 - 10:53 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Dear Omar,
XS 1100 was typical 1970s too much mass and power coupled to run wide handling mind you modern boots and suspension up grades fixes to more acceptable standard.

BMW R65 is a nice gentle bike great for a steady cruise at 60mph. Same for Guzzi v65.
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Omar M. Shams
Grand Master
Username: omar

Post Number: 1244
Registered: 4-2009
Posted on Monday, 03 July, 2017 - 12:43 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

I have just realised that I got one bike wrong. I didn't mean to say I have CRM250 - I sold that ages ago. But I did forget to mention that I have a Honda CB550 F1 and a CB750 K7. Hondas are my favourite bikes.
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Patrick Ryan
Grand Master
Username: patrick_r

Post Number: 1598
Registered: 4-2016
Posted on Monday, 03 July, 2017 - 04:53 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

I'm with you there Omar,

I've had a few Honda's mainly trail bikes, but the CX500 turbo (with the reversed hi vis orange "TURBO" decal above the headlight was my best. Wish I still had it.

I've always wanted a CB750 R or F and I could never afford a VF750F when it came out.

I opted for the blue & silver GPZ900R instead, which then made me fall in love with a few Kwakas after that.

Robert,
Good luck with the purchase mate, enjoy yourself, and stay safe.
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Robert Noel Reddington
Grand Master
Username: bob_uk

Post Number: 1471
Registered: 5-2015
Posted on Tuesday, 04 July, 2017 - 04:04 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Saw another interesting bike a Honda NC750 automatic.
if the autobox is weird the engine is a parallel twin which is 60bhp and red line at 6500 rpm. 55ftlbs at 3500 rpm which is like a modern Smart car engine. The whole aim is for mpg and 3 litres per 100km is possible at 100 kph.
I had the bike after the CX500 the VT500E which did 70,000 miles and clapped out the engine and suspension, the front brake was bad. Still I abused it and never crashed or broke down on it. The final straw was head gaskets and CDI unit failing sold it for a 100.

Today I had a ride on a Honda CG125. What a nice little bike 65mph and 12bhp.
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Patrick Ryan
Grand Master
Username: patrick_r

Post Number: 1600
Registered: 4-2016
Posted on Tuesday, 04 July, 2017 - 08:39 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Great little bike the CG Robert.
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David Gore
Moderator
Username: david_gore

Post Number: 2601
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Tuesday, 04 July, 2017 - 09:17 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Here in the land of Oz, our postal service has used Honda 110cc "step-throughs" for suburban mail deliveries for many years and there is a growing fraternity of enthusiasts who snap these up at disposal auctions and organise events which most "die-hard" bike enthusiasts would regard as a waste of time but they have many participants and a good time is had by all:

https://www.pickles.com.au/about/news/-/content/postie-bikes-canberra

http://www.postiebikechallenge.org/

*
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Robert Noel Reddington
Grand Master
Username: bob_uk

Post Number: 1472
Registered: 5-2015
Posted on Tuesday, 04 July, 2017 - 10:50 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

A bunch of bikers done the lands end to john o groats on Honda C90 cubs.

847 miles plus getting to start point and getting home from the finish 2000 miles total.

I want to do the South West coast run which is about 500 miles, I am only 25 miles from the start and end point which is Southampton.

The CG 125 I had nailed at 66 mph for about 10 miles, I stayed with the bigger bikes on the twisty bits. The biggest bike was a 500 and the smallest was a Tomas moped with pedals.

A word of warning. riding in groups can be dangerous, I slow down if other bikes get too close and apply the 4 sec rule for bikes in front.
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Robert Noel Reddington
Grand Master
Username: bob_uk

Post Number: 1476
Registered: 5-2015
Posted on Tuesday, 18 July, 2017 - 09:53 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

I rode a Suzuki GS 125 yesterday great little bike this one has been tuned a bit with suspension mods and sticky modern tyres. 70mph.

One guy had an old Yamaha RD200 2 stroke which on power went ringer ding ding and on overrun yum yum yum.

We got pulled by a biker cop, he was quite happy at our riding and gave us a warning about lots of mud further up the road from a farm tractor. When we got there sure enough big clods of mud in the road. A car in front flatten some of it out for us. A typical Dorset hazard.

On a bit of dual carriage way 70mph limit a gaggle of big bikes went past us like we were going backwards. They set the speed cameras off.

One of our gang followed another overtaking a bus, this is dangerous because if the first rider makes a mistake then the following rider could be in trouble. Never follow through, allow first rider to complete over take then decide whether its safe to overtake or not.
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Robert Noel Reddington
Grand Master
Username: bob_uk

Post Number: 1487
Registered: 5-2015
Posted on Sunday, 30 July, 2017 - 11:07 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Nice day today, so off on another motor bike ride.
This time Suzuki 2 stroke 70cc step through like a honda Cub. 8 bhp and 55mph nailed. Zoom zoom.

Look where you are going.

A fellow rider on a RD200 went berm riding in the kerb on a slow right hand curve due to target fixation, he was looking at the verge rather than round the corner and rode into the kerb up a grass verge around the posts and back on to the road, it was failing legs every where with a hes off. No hes still on. Well held that man sort of thing.

Todays competition was slow riding with both feet up I came 3rd. The winner stood up on the pegs and stayed stationary for ages then moved a bit and repeated.

Check out Dougie Lampkin on Ytube and Red Bull.

Bikers spend millions on stuff for their bikes, the cheapest and most cost effective accessory is practice and training like slow speed riding, going fast in a straight line is easy. The skills last a life time.
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Alan Ford
Prolific User
Username: herne13

Post Number: 200
Registered: 8-2016
Posted on Monday, 21 August, 2017 - 02:06 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

This weekend I purchased this for the Bonneville, I should now be able to mount the motorcycle with ease. I expect to have it attached and ready by mid Spring at the latest. I now have to make a trip to Inverloch, Victoria to pick it up.

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ross kowalski
Grand Master
Username: cdfpw

Post Number: 510
Registered: 11-2015
Posted on Monday, 21 August, 2017 - 02:23 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Alan,

I'm still looking at your lighted flying B on my desk. So don't think I forgot, just been " a little" busy.

Have you ridden with a side Hack before? Just curious as I remember the first time I rode a with a sidecar. Pretty weird. A good friend of mine says the only good thing about a side car is if you fly it, then your motorcycle drives like a bike again!

https://youtu.be/xSkodHDSav8?t=8

Looks like they used a wheel from a Mini. Nice.
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Alan Ford
Prolific User
Username: herne13

Post Number: 201
Registered: 8-2016
Posted on Monday, 21 August, 2017 - 02:33 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Hi Ross, et al.
Thanks for the update, I was hoping you hadn't given up on the flying B project. Nice to hear you are just plain busy, that's ok a man has to earn a crust whilst he can.

No, I have never ridden with a chair before. As you say I expect it to be a weird sensation. I absolutely must learn to fly it, everybody advises that, best to practice it before one gets committed into a corner and all hell breaks loose. I have a fellow who lives a couple of paddocks down from me and he has offered to give me any tuition I might need, he is well experienced with outfits. Should be fun :-)
The sidecar is a DJP, I don't believe I mentioned that before, it looks to be in very good condition but I know the windscreen perspect (perspex) is cracked and needs to be replaced plus some minor cracks that will need a fresh application of fibreglass, a lot of sanding and then a touch of paint. Luckily fibreglassing is not hard. I have given myself a few months to complete these tasks as I have no desire to go riding in the wind and rain :-) Call me a summertime bikie lol.
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Robert Noel Reddington
Grand Master
Username: bob_uk

Post Number: 1494
Registered: 5-2015
Posted on Monday, 21 August, 2017 - 11:19 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

First time I drove a side car I immediately figured it out, if you can drive a car and ride a motorbike then you can quickly adapt to side car. A mile is all it takes.

I would fit a one tooth smaller gearbox sprocket, thus lowering the final gearing.

Fit car battery in side side-car near side-car wheel for weight ballast and extra electricity.
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Alan Ford
Prolific User
Username: herne13

Post Number: 202
Registered: 8-2016
Posted on Monday, 21 August, 2017 - 11:57 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Thanks Robert N. R. That is about what I figured, it cant be that hard to learn but I will take all the advice offered.
I have already thought about the extra battery as I read somewhere of others doing it.
I hadn't considered a gearing change but I will now.

I would appreciate it if anyone could advise me on using the starter motor as a reverse gear. I am told it's the easy way but electrics leave me cold. Apparently it is used just like moving a car forward by winding it over but of course it will not start. I am thinking this could be a hard life for a starter motor. Any thoughts???? anyone :-)
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ross kowalski
Grand Master
Username: cdfpw

Post Number: 511
Registered: 11-2015
Posted on Tuesday, 22 August, 2017 - 10:39 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Alan,

The Honda goldwing did this sort of reversing, but it's more complicated than spinning the motor backwards I think.

I'm spoiled with mechanical reversing on the bikes.
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David Towers
Prolific User
Username: xtriple

Post Number: 162
Registered: 6-2010
Posted on Tuesday, 22 August, 2017 - 07:09 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

I've had a couple of GoldWings - 1500 and an 1800 while at the same time a fair collection of sports bikes (R1, Thunderace, Triumph Bonneville - 1969 - my favourite)and the reverse gear is very much needed! The 1500 was massively heavy and the slightest incline if you were trying to back into the kerb or whatever was impossible without a push or the reverse gear. I don't know how they do it but it was the starter motor and worked very well.

Also... I have ridden a sidecar once and it was without a shadow of a doubt the most terrifying experience of my life! Accelerate and you steer right (sidecar on the left) and at about 15 - 20 MPH the wobble from the handlebars was, slightly disconcerting! Slowing down and you steer left as the bike and sidecar disagree about momentum, and cornering.... ye Gods! Right turn decelerate or hold a neutral throttle and left turns accelerate through... forget at your own risk!

This was an old Suzuki GS1000 where the hack had been 'slung on' and it was dreadful and so scary I genuinely feared for my safety - I was scared to slow down because the wobble as it slowed was so bad. I have also been a passenger (what a mug!) in a race set up Honda GoldWing 'kneeler' with leading link forks and about an inch of ground clearance, it looked about as much like a 'Wing as my dogs behind! It was a totally different experience and almost pleasant after my initial fear and trepidation and felt like a racing car with a wheel missing.

Incidentally, this was back in the days when I 'club raced' and sidecar owners/drivers would pay people to go in the 'chair so they could race. You had to be feeling VERY poor before accepting the money I can tell you!
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Robert Noel Reddington
Grand Master
Username: bob_uk

Post Number: 1496
Registered: 5-2015
Posted on Tuesday, 22 August, 2017 - 09:22 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

reversing the startermotor is complicated and a major engineering change so not doable.

In the Uk we fit side cars to the left of the bike.

When turn left take it easy. Right hand turns are slightly heavier than left.

As I said one very quickly learns the ropes.

Side car is nothing like steering a solo motorbike.

Consult youtube for lots of details such as geometry etc.
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Nigel Johnson
Prolific User
Username: nigel_johnson

Post Number: 164
Registered: 12-2008
Posted on Wednesday, 23 August, 2017 - 08:43 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Best year for the Bonneville 1969 without a doubt.
Regards, Nigel.
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ross kowalski
Grand Master
Username: cdfpw

Post Number: 512
Registered: 11-2015
Posted on Wednesday, 23 August, 2017 - 11:42 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Alan, RNR's point about checking the youtubes for info on geometry is dead on.

Both of mine are set up correctly and are not too bad. The pull to the right on accelerating and pull left on decelerating take a while to get used to. The death wobble in the bars on acceleration is a thing, but can be all but tuned out with proper damping and sidecar frame geometry. The old BMW r's with the sidehack frame mounting lugs had a steering damper that you could a little drag to the steering. While a terrible idea to have any when driving solo, it would help cancel a lot of the acceleration wobble.

The cars wheel should have a degree or two of positive camber and a little toe in of 2 or 3 degrees towards the bike.

When I got one of the bikes the geometry was wayout in both metrics and the bike was squirrly as to be un-ridable at speeds over 30mph. It was just really scary under 30mph.

If you can, have someone familiar with sidecars install and test drive it.

Getting used to side cars is like driving on the right and left in cars, at first you are thinking about it then it becomes second nature.
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Robert Noel Reddington
Grand Master
Username: bob_uk

Post Number: 1497
Registered: 5-2015
Posted on Thursday, 24 August, 2017 - 12:28 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Check out the 1200cc Bonnie 2017
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David Gore
Moderator
Username: david_gore

Post Number: 2642
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Saturday, 26 August, 2017 - 08:25 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Slightly off-topic but relevant; the rider in the article on the following link is the son of a client of my partner before she retired and his father played a significant part in helping another Manning Valley rider become a World Champion. I am referring to Troy Bayliss, 3 times World Super Bike Champion riding for Ducati.

http://www.manningrivertimes.com.au/story/4879909/josh-hook-signs-with-tsr-honda/?cs=1215

Both riders started their careers racing dirt bikes at the Taree Motor Cycle track on Old Bar road. In recent years, following his retirement from racing, Troy has organised an annual event [The Troy Bayliss Classic] at the TMC track with several well-known overseas riders participating; unfortunately the event scheduled for January 2018 has been postponed due to sponsorship difficulties however the Club is confident the event will resume in 2019 with new sponsors and help from government and local tourism authorities.

https://www.facebook.com/TroyBaylissClassic/

If you are interested in motor cycle racing, keep an eye on this young rider; he is talented and with a competitive bike he could emulate his mate Troy.
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Robert Noel Reddington
Grand Master
Username: bob_uk

Post Number: 1504
Registered: 5-2015
Posted on Friday, 01 September, 2017 - 02:01 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Dirt bikes is where I started, its always a good way to learn motorbiking skills.

Today I was checking out a 200mph 200bhp 14000rpm 0-60 in 2.5 secs motorbike owned by a matey down Poole quay.

Kawasaki ZZR1400R 15,000 new

The owner calls it the silliest bike he has ever owned. 1st gear goes from 0 to 70mph. 6th gear goes from 30mph to 200mph (GPS on these bikes has indicated 190mph). tyres are 400 a pair and last 4000 miles if lucky. He spends most of the time below 6000rpm in slow throttle response mode where the bike behaves like a gentle pussy cat.
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Robert Noel Reddington
Grand Master
Username: bob_uk

Post Number: 1528
Registered: 5-2015
Posted on Friday, 22 September, 2017 - 08:54 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Suzuki GSX S 750

Clever feature. The fuel injection ECU is connected to the clutch and gear box as well.

when pulling away the idle speed is increased so its not necessary to open the throttle.

4 cylinder in line creamy smooth. 115 wheel BHP and 210 kgs a bit porky.

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