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Robert Noel Reddington
Grand Master
Username: bob_uk

Post Number: 1458
Registered: 5-2015
Posted on Tuesday, 20 June, 2017 - 05:26 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

A biker mate has been trying to allay my fears of riding motorbikes.

Today I saw a bike hit by a car whilst the bike was stationary in traffic.

No injury but both car and bike damaged.

No matter how good my bike riding skills are I cant stop cars hitting me.
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David Towers
Prolific User
Username: xtriple

Post Number: 156
Registered: 6-2010
Posted on Tuesday, 20 June, 2017 - 07:54 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Having ridden bikes for 40 years, that was one of my biggest fears so I always watched the mirrors when stationary in traffic. If anything untoward is occurring behind, a quick manoeuver out and around what ever is ahead sees you out of danger.

However, no bike should be stuck in traffic! Lane split (speed appropriate of course and I really mean that) to the head of the queue and keep away from all 4 wheeled (or more)vehicles - they are all out to kill you!

Bike riding is fabulous but also there are inherent dangers that require you to be on your toes and aware of your surroundings at all times. Riding a bike well is a fully absorbing job/hobby and everyone should be MADE to ride bikes for a year before becoming a car driver, it makes you so much more aware of what is going on around you and you spot trouble long before it affects you in a very short space of time.

I am no longer able to ride (ill health weakness)and miss it every day.
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Robert Noel Reddington
Grand Master
Username: bob_uk

Post Number: 1459
Registered: 5-2015
Posted on Tuesday, 20 June, 2017 - 09:39 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

I started riding motorbikes in 1967 (legal on road) and what with not very good tyres of the day learnt a lot about riding safely which stood me in good stead for 4 wheels and once 3 wheels.

some of my motor bike skills included very heavy braking and riding whilst stood on the seat.

I saw the accident because I was looking a the bike, a Yamaha MT 09 Tracer. 900cc 3 cylinder and 100bhp. And traction control ABS etc. The bike still ended up on the deck.

I have a disease which makes me tried and unmotivated and understand your last sentence perfectly.
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Alan Ford
Prolific User
Username: herne13

Post Number: 198
Registered: 8-2016
Posted on Wednesday, 21 June, 2017 - 06:33 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

I know, you are just trying to scare me ;) As it happens I recently purchased a 2001 Triumph Bonneville T100.
I don't know how I am going to ride it with my damn legs the way they are (venous ulcers) but I will find a way even if it means adding a sidecar which is something I am considering. I used to ride motorcycles and thoroughly enjoyed them. I hope I still do.

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Patrick Ryan
Grand Master
Username: patrick_r

Post Number: 1584
Registered: 4-2016
Posted on Wednesday, 21 June, 2017 - 07:35 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Magnificent looking machine Alan,

Love the colours.
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Robert Noel Reddington
Grand Master
Username: bob_uk

Post Number: 1460
Registered: 5-2015
Posted on Wednesday, 21 June, 2017 - 07:43 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

The T100 is a good bike that balances very nicely at a walking pace.

I can get my feet down flat on the deck 5ft 10

Ulcers in veins sound chronic and painful.

I am scared that you will have a mishap and hurt a leg starting something off.

But its your decision taking in to account those near to you.

First thing to do is to take training from a riding school
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Alan Ford
Prolific User
Username: herne13

Post Number: 199
Registered: 8-2016
Posted on Wednesday, 21 June, 2017 - 11:26 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Thanks Robert and Patrick. I agree the T100 is a nicely balanced bike, much better than the Harley I owned.
The leg ulcers are indeed a concern and the slightest knock can set them off, that is something I have to deal with as I do not wish to live the last years of my life just existing in comfort and safety, I want to live again. I wont need training lessons for the bike BUT if I do get a sidecar then I will need lessons and they have already been arranged. :-)
Oh yes before I forget the bike has only 22,700Ks on it which is not bad for a 2001 model.

David, was riding a motorcycle to school at age 15 in Sth Australia, I wasn't licensed at the time but got away with it. I obtained a license at 15yrs 9 months, they were pretty easy going about it in those days.
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David Towers
Prolific User
Username: xtriple

Post Number: 157
Registered: 6-2010
Posted on Wednesday, 21 June, 2017 - 07:14 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Old age and poor health is an absolute bugger for wrecking our fun on bikes! My spine is crumbling away to mush and even though I was aware of the condition for years, I carried on riding. I had to give up when the pain became too much for two days after each ride... also because I was warned that one more 'off' would mean a ride in a nice helicopter to hospital and a lifetime in a wheelchair from then on.

I also used to ride to school on an S2 Kawasaki(350cc 2 stroke triple) without the er... legal niceties and did so very happily, noisily and speedily until I interfaced said Kawasaki with the innocent rear end of a parked Transit van!

5 months in hospital at age 16 was no fun at all!
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Robert Noel Reddington
Grand Master
Username: bob_uk

Post Number: 1461
Registered: 5-2015
Posted on Wednesday, 21 June, 2017 - 09:03 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Check out the 2017 version of the Bonnieville.
traction control and abs plus more chrome.

The worst injury I have had from an off was a broken wrist, even worst my lovely GPZ900S got scuffed.
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Robert Noel Reddington
Grand Master
Username: bob_uk

Post Number: 1462
Registered: 5-2015
Posted on Thursday, 22 June, 2017 - 02:30 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

I want a 2017 T100 900cc in blue.
with leather throw overs and a full tank.

ride off into the sunset 32c today in Bournemouth
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David Gore
Moderator
Username: david_gore

Post Number: 2583
Registered: 4-2003
Posted on Thursday, 22 June, 2017 - 09:26 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Robert,

Enjoy the warmth while you can - normal "liquid sunshine" will return shortly .
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Robert Noel Reddington
Grand Master
Username: bob_uk

Post Number: 1463
Registered: 5-2015
Posted on Sunday, 25 June, 2017 - 05:16 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Bournemouth weather is still good.

Today I saw a neat little bike a cafe racer style a Suzuki GS 500 twin. The owner paid 500 for a moted runner and put bits on it, rear sets, clip ons, twin wicks and racing flints. He spent around 500 on bits. 110mph.

So motorbikes can still be brought at a low price and you get to wear leather riding trousers.
Or a leather romper suit.

On Youtube is a MC rider. This site is like the police roadcraft manual & well worth checking out and he does a specific bit about road junctions and positioning yourself to give other road users the best possible view of the bike.
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John Beech
Grand Master
Username: jbeech

Post Number: 406
Registered: 10-2016
Posted on Sunday, 25 June, 2017 - 11:06 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Robert Noel,

You may as well move into a padded rubber room if the goal is to stay safe because the alternative is accepting the risk that sometimes things happen.

I've been riding since 1969 and have been involved in accident twice, once seriously. Someone mentioned staying alert. At traffic signals I position the bike such that I can accelerate forward if needs be and am mindful of the rear view mirror in case someone approaches too fast to stop. I'm also very wary of people about to turn left in front of me. Oh, and by the way, I wear a full-face helmet in a bright fluorescent yellow color to aid visibility. However the most important thing to remember is the larger vehicle has the right of way regardless of the law, or put another way, might makes right.

All that said, you just have to accept the fact that chance plays a role in life. Is what it is.
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Robert Noel Reddington
Grand Master
Username: bob_uk

Post Number: 1464
Registered: 5-2015
Posted on Sunday, 25 June, 2017 - 09:38 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

I just fell out of bed.

In traffic road, position and speed are king.

In Bournemouth the average traffic speed is 22mph.
Its surprising the amount of bikers who have trouble at lower speeds and drop the bike. Also accelerating too fast, which catches other road uses out.
Right of way is an old fashioned idea.

On Ytube are plenty of vids showing near misses which wouldn't have happened if the biker had not ridden into that space. Instead of taking action they decide they have the right of way and ride into the problem space or zone.

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