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John Beech
Grand Master
Username: jbeech

Post Number: 387
Registered: 10-2016
Posted on Saturday, 13 May, 2017 - 06:49 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

On Patrick Lockyear's suggestion, a thread regarding motorbikes we've owned where Page-Down's your friend if you don't feel like reading one of my massive missives!

I've been riding since my first minibike ca. 1968 (3-1/2 hp Briggs & Stratton pull start, friction foot brake against the face of the tire - and no suspension whatsoever beyond the air in same). Fast forward through many dirt bikes (and a brief motocross 'career' on a YZ125, ca 1972-73), plus participation in a lot of enduro races. Of the latter, one in particular where I broke my collar bone traversing a huge mud hole. This wreck resulted in my having to ride 12 miles to get to the trailers! Plus there have been a few street bikes. My first real street bike was a Suzuki TS-50 (50cc). My parents helped buy it for me new by adding $200 to my savings from a summer mowing lawns. This, also by the way, was the bike on which I had my one and only serious accident. This, when an old guy in Cadillac turned left in front of me. I ended up in the hospital (only waking as they unloaded me from the ambulance).

My first motorcycle, a Suzuki TS-50
-- My first motorcycle, a 1971 Suzuki TS-50


Next up was a Yamaha RD350. No photos exist of this one, which was a 1973 model. A a lightweight 350cc 2-stroke twin, my mother cried when my father took me to buy it (using money I'd saved from my job delivering newspapers). The rage at the time were cafe racers and I was enthralled by them. I soon welded up steel tubing to make home made clip-on handle bars (in my high school automotive shop and with the aid of my instructor because I didn't (and still don't) know much about the art of welding). Anyway, he did one and I did the other under his supervision and they worked great! I also shortened the brake pedal so I could use the passenger pegs and shortened and reversed the shift lever. Getting used to the reversed shift pattern was trivial and I had great fun playing street racer. BTW, at the time I was working at Honda Central in Birmingham (the one in Alabama, USA) as an assembly boy. This involved operating a fork lift to drop a wooden crate off a 3-high stack, removing a mostly built motorcycle, and doing basic assembly, e.g. install the front wheel and handle bars as well as adding oil, one gallon of gasoline, plus a battery. Best part was the 15 minute test ride before signing it off. I was only 15 and this was one of my first jobs ever (I still held the very job whilst at Honda Central, an AM paper route for the Birmingham News). Before that, I pumped gasoline at the local Gulf station. Anyway, I loved that motorcycle and because they sponsored a two-bike racing team, I often got to accompany them to Talladega Motor Speedway (a tri-oval NASCAR superspeedway) where they tested and raced on the infield road course. Once, following a crash they tasked me with fitting a new fairing to the bike. When I subsequently learned the fairing remains were up for grabs I ask for and received permission to keep them. This led to my first foray into working with glass fiber and resin whereby I made a credible repair and fitted same to my bike. Having taken 'great' care with fitting the pieces together I never painted the fairing so that the numbers and stickers stayed on it and thus, it looked the part of a racer - me and my gang blasted over all the two lanes roads within a 100 miles of home, regularly. Like I said, I loved that thing but sadly, no photos exist!

A few short years later, whilst attending university, I purchased a Kawasaki Z1-R. I bought this one new as well. It was a 1000cc 4-cylinder sport bike and I especially loved the power of this motorcycle because of the fact it would accelerate like a rocket and top out at 143 mph! I rode it back and forth to class and a few years later sold it. That put paid to street bike motorcycle ownership for nearly 10 years. I don't have any photos of that bike either, but I snagged this one off the internet to show what it looked like.
1978 Kawasaki Z1-R
-- 1978 Kawasaki Z1-R . . . but not mine, just a photo off the internet.

Next was a Moto Guzzi 750SS. I purchased it used for $800 on the recommendation of a friend who raved about how great they were. Sadly, and once again, no photos exist. This was a decent enough motorcycle, but a bit of a clunker in my opinion. Partly it was because final drive was via a drive shaft instead of a chain. Although, also in part, this was because compared to my memory of the Kawasaki, it was unforgivably slow (smaller displacement plus my weight was up to 200 from 156 pounds). However, and in all honesty, I principally got rid of it due to the drive shaft because it had one disconcerting characteristic, to which I never quite cottoned. Basically, the rear end humped up slightly under deceleration and I didn't like that so when coming out of the post office a fellow expressed admiration for the bike and made the mistake of offering more than I could refuse, I sold it (and would have taken considerably less because by then I was rather less than enthused with it). That said, and without exception, every single owner I've ever spoken with cherish these bikes. Anyway, I don't really miss the old girl and that sale put paid to my street bike ownership for another twenty years (however, I've always owned an off road bikes of some sort, e.g. Suzuki DR350 was a lot of fun although rather heavy). Then suddenly, out of the blue, the bug bit me again. That's when I purchased my present bike, a Harley Davidson Sportster. This happened in 2009 (during the economic crisis when cash was king). The right deal for a used 2005 came and I purchased this bike. She only had 3500 miles on the odometer and cost a mere $3500 and because I had money burning a hole in my pocket, the deal was struck. As an aside, this is the only time in memory I didn't try and negotiate a better purchase price. This, because the seller was unemployed and clearly over a barrel (and I don't believe in kicking someone when they're down).

Meanwhile, I live just up the road from Daytona Beach, which twice a year hosts a rather large motorcycle event - people come from across the country and around the world to attend because it's a 'happening'. While this event is a big deal for many, to be frank, I didn't (and still don't) like to attend events with so many people. Perhaps it's because I am a little claustrophobic, and perhaps it's because I'm just not a joiner - dunno. Regardless, I am definitely not the prototypical 'Harley guy'. Let me explain. My Sportster, if you're unfamiliar with the breed, is the smaller displacement of two offerings. Mine has the 883cc engine. They also make a 1200cc version and although I find the power of mine satisfactory, most folks prefer the larger displacement engine. To be frank, I've ridden a 1200 and if I were buying a new one, that's what I'd buy . . . but that said, the 883 is OK in the power department (and for between $550-800 I can buy a conversion, including one from Harley themselves). But like I said, for how I use it, the 883 is OK - this, despite the fact my weight has now burgeoned to 250 pounds! Anyway, the Sporters are, for reasons initially unknown to me, sneered at and looked down upon by many Harley guys as a 'Girly bike'. This, apparently just because it's significantly smaller and more compact than a traditional 'hog'. FYI, the Sportster has a one-piece crankcase while the traditional Harley has a massive engine crankcase joined to the transmission by a chain or belt intermediate drive. Displacement range up to 2000cc and the wight of some of these hogs approximate double that my Sportster! I suppose in comparison my Sportster 'is' dainty but at over 400 pounds, she has plenty of heft, believe me. Also, Sportster final drive is via a belt on the right hand side whilst the 'hogs' use wither a chain or belt, but on the left hand side.

Bottom line? I find the Harley-Davidson Sportster to be an immensely satisfying motorcycle. This, despite not being particularly powerful (and much lest very fast). I find it quite a decent piece of machinery. Mine is a 2005 model and has several things to recommend it over earlier iterations. Chief amongst them is a rubber mounted engine. I've ridden a solid mounted version and it sucked in comparison because my feet went numb from the vibration (and in very short order). Moreover, it's been über reliable (an anvil comes to mind). Also, it's carbureted whilst later models received fuel injection but that's a virtue in this case because these carbs are so very simple. BTW, I ride my Harley a lot. Maybe three or four times a week. This, usually, for local errands, e.g. this morning to the laboratory for blood work before my doctor's appointment in two weeks.


2005 Harley-Davidson Sportster
-- Ignore the chrome helmet, it came with the bike - I ride with a full-face brain bucket!

Finally, these days 50 miles is a lot so I'm more of a lover than a fighter but I count amongst my friends riders of rather old motorcycles - like Indian, Rudge, and Vincent. Thus, I know a little bit about what 'real' motorcycles are all about. For example, my pal Andy Hopkins is a retired London cop and rides his Black Shadow all over the continent when he's home from Bermuda (what began as a customer relationship blossomed into genuine friendship). Andy, especially, is a card carrying member of the iron butt brigade (most recently, a 1000 mile tour of the Emerald Isle). While I know this is a thread about bikes we've owned, this is my friend Andy heading out on tour.

Andy and his Vincent Black Shadow
-- My pal Andy Hopkins heading out to Ireland on a real motorcycle!
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Patrick Lockyer.
Grand Master
Username: pat_lockyer

Post Number: 1339
Registered: 9-2004
Posted on Saturday, 13 May, 2017 - 07:53 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

This is a bike that I bought years ago, an animal to ride so it is passing away peacefully parked in doors.




a few of some bikes, plenty of dust.
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David Towers
Prolific User
Username: xtriple

Post Number: 150
Registered: 6-2010
Posted on Saturday, 13 May, 2017 - 07:14 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

I wish it were easier to upload pictures, I could bore you all for hours with snaps of my bikes! I was a 'biker' all my life and while I've always had cars, bikes were my first love.

Can't ride now (sob!).
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Robert Noel Reddington
Grand Master
Username: bob_uk

Post Number: 1423
Registered: 5-2015
Posted on Saturday, 13 May, 2017 - 10:02 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

I love bikes but fear driving one in todays traffic. Even at 30 mph it isnt safe.

Modern bikes are silly fast. check out the Kawasaki H2R 320bhp and 200kg.
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Patrick Francis
Prolific User
Username: jackpot

Post Number: 116
Registered: 11-2016
Posted on Saturday, 13 May, 2017 - 11:16 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

This is mine



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Patrick Francis
Prolific User
Username: jackpot

Post Number: 117
Registered: 11-2016
Posted on Sunday, 14 May, 2017 - 01:24 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Gearlever by the tank, and a foot clutch - interesting to drive to say the least!!
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Patrick Lockyer.
Grand Master
Username: pat_lockyer

Post Number: 1342
Registered: 9-2004
Posted on Sunday, 14 May, 2017 - 05:28 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Love the colour combination, the bike looks mint.
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Robert Noel Reddington
Grand Master
Username: bob_uk

Post Number: 1424
Registered: 5-2015
Posted on Sunday, 14 May, 2017 - 07:18 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Rhubarb and custard.

smashing bike
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Omar M. Shams
Grand Master
Username: omar

Post Number: 1195
Registered: 4-2009
Posted on Monday, 15 May, 2017 - 04:55 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP



I love my bikes. But I am too scared to die on them on our roads so i just look at them.

I dont know how to ride slowly. I ride like a demon and used to control my bikes like a dream. Now that i am old - I cant rely on that sharp response so I only ride off road now.

I have two GL1000 (one red one black) from 75 and 76. Two GS1000 one blue one white. One CB750K7 (78), one CB550 (75) one XS-Eleven (79), two Z900s one brown one blue and a KH400 in purple.

The only bike inside the house is the Blue GS1000 (thanks to my son accepting me paying rent on a space in his bedroom).
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Omar M. Shams
Grand Master
Username: omar

Post Number: 1196
Registered: 4-2009
Posted on Monday, 15 May, 2017 - 04:58 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

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Patrick Lockyer.
Grand Master
Username: pat_lockyer

Post Number: 1343
Registered: 9-2004
Posted on Monday, 15 May, 2017 - 06:16 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Omar great bikes, also in superb condition.
Had a look in the corner of one of the sheds and a couple of the early models The Kawasaki is a 500 H 1 triple Mach III but also as "widow maker" the wife insisted I stopped riding it years ago.


The Suzuki GT 750 is also a triple two stroke but water cooled.
This is known as the "kettle.
They drank the fuel like no tomorrow.



Note the steering damper fitted to stop Tank slap out of the corners under power.
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Patrick Ryan
Grand Master
Username: patrick_r

Post Number: 1535
Registered: 4-2016
Posted on Monday, 15 May, 2017 - 07:43 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Omar,

You never cease to amaze me mate.

Just when I think my collection of vintage lawn mowers in my living room was pretty unique, you hit me with motor bikes in yours!

Well done mate.
Your wife is obviously a saint, and combine this with the hoist situation, you are a very lucky man indeed
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Omar M. Shams
Grand Master
Username: omar

Post Number: 1197
Registered: 4-2009
Posted on Tuesday, 16 May, 2017 - 04:50 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Dear Patrick L,
You have two masterpieces. Both those bikes are real dreams. When I was a full on biker, the older guys (the late 20s and early 30s guys) had these bikes. And then there was the British bike brigade. I always looked at the older guys bikes and never managed to own any until I was much older. The bikes I wanted the most were the GL1000s which were rare in the UK (where I grew up). Both your bikes are in great original condition and worthy of a bedroom trophy.

Dear Patrick R,
The wife met me whilst I was restoring a GS1000S in my living room in the 80s. She accepted that attitude on day 1. But now on day million... she has stopped me from putting one of the Goldwings in the bedroom. Even though there is bags of space to lose at least one of them in the bedroom. Luckily for me, my son came to my rescue and allowed me to park one bike in his bedroom (the blue GS1000E).

There is nothing like a bike rush. I am almost tempted to get one of the bikes out for a spin again.......
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Patrick Lockyer.
Grand Master
Username: pat_lockyer

Post Number: 1344
Registered: 9-2004
Posted on Tuesday, 16 May, 2017 - 07:03 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Omar "bike rush" I'm tempted too, a track day at Thruxton maybe, but age is catching up on me.
Have some other bikes in original condition somewhere.
DKW Hercules W2000 Wankel IMO better than a Norton rotory, Ok Supreme wonderful for its day, Vincent Comet, wife thought it was horrible being pillion on a bumpy road, and more but will look and see if I can get some pix up if it not boring to many folk.
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Patrick Francis
Prolific User
Username: jackpot

Post Number: 119
Registered: 11-2016
Posted on Tuesday, 16 May, 2017 - 08:25 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Hi Guys

Lovely bikes you all have. No matter what condition they are in, they all exhude a character - very jealous.

They strike a nostalgic chord of my drooling teenage years.

I always longed for a Kawasaki 250 triple because they looked big enough to be a 500 and could be ridden on a provisional licence at the time in UK. Luckily I couldn't afford one because they were famously rotten handling bikes - as Patrick L says "widow makers".

I had a Benelli 750 Sei for a while. A six cylinder zinger with 6 separate carbs which I was forever trying to balance.

I also owned a bit of an orphan which was a Harley Davidson 250 2-stroke which was built under licence by Cagiva. Very loud and unreliable.

Bikes bring smiles to our faces, but age makes us aware of the dangers, so we dream about riding them again whilst we waft along in our Rolls Royces.

Bike Rush - Maybe we should start a "RROC Chapter" - Long hair, pony tails, appropriate tattoos and short sleeve leather jackets compulsory!!
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John Beech
Grand Master
Username: jbeech

Post Number: 389
Registered: 10-2016
Posted on Tuesday, 16 May, 2017 - 11:47 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Patrick, I once rode an H1. That things was scary fast. Especially the way the power would hit and then it was off like a shot. Put maybe 40-50 miles on it mostly being only a little stupid, e.g. about how I've handled a rattlesnake after I knew I had a firm grasp of it's head. Scared, thrilled, and full of adrenaline. Anyway, I fully respected it because the magazines of the time were chock full of articles about its handling vices (whilst full of praise for it's performance). Also, a friend had an S2 (the 350 version), which he let me ride. He could easily smoke my RD350 because it, too, was scary fast. Anyway, I'm very glad you never killed yourself on your H1.
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Patrick Lockyer.
Grand Master
Username: pat_lockyer

Post Number: 1345
Registered: 9-2004
Posted on Tuesday, 16 May, 2017 - 05:25 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

John, I found that as the power band came in to play to early in the exit of a bend the worst part was getting the thing through as it always wanted to go strait on.
The smell of 2 stroke and a smoke screen was something else.
Ah the smoke reminds me of my days with the Arial Super Sports and Leader now that did fill the roads with smoke.
Never had a RD 350 but my Son did to his much enjoyment.
BTW I have a 250cc S1B Mach 1 and more Suzuki bikes ie Stinger 125cc, T350 Rebel. I think I need help!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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richard george yeaman
Grand Master
Username: richyrich

Post Number: 750
Registered: 4-2012
Posted on Tuesday, 16 May, 2017 - 08:24 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

I think you are all mad and beyond help.

Richard.
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Patrick Lockyer.
Grand Master
Username: pat_lockyer

Post Number: 1347
Registered: 9-2004
Posted on Tuesday, 16 May, 2017 - 09:00 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

And I thought it was just the Irish!!!!!
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Robert Noel Reddington
Grand Master
Username: bob_uk

Post Number: 1425
Registered: 5-2015
Posted on Wednesday, 17 May, 2017 - 12:52 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

i had a go on a honda fireblade and it was so smooth and fast that it wasnt scary which made it even more scary sort of.
It lulls you into a false sense of security.

I find that a 500 twin has enough power for a bit of fun and touring, but if touring a lot a 600 4 cylinder works better. plus cost arnt too bad.

Last bike I had was a 1987 Honda VT500E which was a nice bike it would sit all day at 75mph up and down dale never missed a beat.
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Omar M. Shams
Grand Master
Username: omar

Post Number: 1198
Registered: 4-2009
Posted on Wednesday, 17 May, 2017 - 01:09 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

my dream bike...... Honda CBX in red.....
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Patrick Lockyer.
Grand Master
Username: pat_lockyer

Post Number: 1348
Registered: 9-2004
Posted on Wednesday, 17 May, 2017 - 02:23 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

This is my 37 Ok Supreme Silver Cloud passing away peacefully.


The Vincent comet also having a well earned rest.



The DKW Wankel 2000. in all its glory.
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Omar M. Shams
Grand Master
Username: omar

Post Number: 1199
Registered: 4-2009
Posted on Wednesday, 17 May, 2017 - 02:37 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

very nice indeed......
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Mark Luft
Frequent User
Username: bentleyman1993

Post Number: 68
Registered: 10-2016
Posted on Wednesday, 17 May, 2017 - 03:48 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Patrick L.: I too had a Suzuki "Water Buffalo", loved it until it locked up idling in the driveway.
These are my two bikes for now. A 1969 BSA Rocket 3 and a 1998 Triumph Trophy 1200. The Triumph is scary fast. Glad we have this thread.

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Graham Watson
Experienced User
Username: graham508

Post Number: 47
Registered: 3-2016
Posted on Wednesday, 17 May, 2017 - 03:54 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Very neat bikes! Not knowing a thing about a rotary engine on a bike, did it make a difference in the handling?
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Omar M. Shams
Grand Master
Username: omar

Post Number: 1200
Registered: 4-2009
Posted on Wednesday, 17 May, 2017 - 04:25 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

John thanks for starting this brilliant thread.
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Patrick Lockyer.
Grand Master
Username: pat_lockyer

Post Number: 1349
Registered: 9-2004
Posted on Wednesday, 17 May, 2017 - 06:19 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Graham Yes the handling was very light weight and lovely to ride.
I had a Suzuki RE5 rotary and was a IMO clumsy bike to ride.
Sold it not so long ago.

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Patrick Lockyer.
Grand Master
Username: pat_lockyer

Post Number: 1350
Registered: 9-2004
Posted on Wednesday, 17 May, 2017 - 06:50 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Mark that BSA looks great what a bike. Had a road rocket years ago and had to slip the clutch to get going up to 50mph in 1st gear from my memory.
Have some BSA bike, C10 and a something Star but will put a pix up.



C10
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Patrick Francis
Prolific User
Username: jackpot

Post Number: 120
Registered: 11-2016
Posted on Wednesday, 17 May, 2017 - 07:57 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

When I was in Nigeria, we had 2 Bultaco 350 trail bikes that we would ride into the jungle with a jerry can of fuel strapped to the back of our bikes. We would ride as far in as our fuel would allow us, refuel from our jerry cans, and ride back.
Always important that the jerry can held more than the tank!!
Love your collection Patrick L. Was the DKW reliable?
My Harley is a '39.
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David Towers
Prolific User
Username: xtriple

Post Number: 151
Registered: 6-2010
Posted on Wednesday, 17 May, 2017 - 06:50 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Posted on Wednesday, 17 May, 2017 - 01:09 am:   


my dream bike...... Honda CBX in red.....

Would you like me to post pictures of my fully restored one with Australian made stainless 6-6 exhausts?
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David Towers
Prolific User
Username: xtriple

Post Number: 152
Registered: 6-2010
Posted on Wednesday, 17 May, 2017 - 07:04 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP





and when I first got it....

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David Towers
Prolific User
Username: xtriple

Post Number: 153
Registered: 6-2010
Posted on Wednesday, 17 May, 2017 - 07:11 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP





My beloved Bonnie, not terribly original...
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Omar M. Shams
Grand Master
Username: omar

Post Number: 1201
Registered: 4-2009
Posted on Wednesday, 17 May, 2017 - 07:25 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Dear David,
You are indeed a lucky man. What a magnificent example...... and in red too!!!
One day i will have one in my living room. But until then..... are they a bitch to fix? or to ride? or to own?
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David Towers
Prolific User
Username: xtriple

Post Number: 154
Registered: 6-2010
Posted on Wednesday, 17 May, 2017 - 08:22 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Bitch to fix, easy to ride, easy to own - it's a Honda after all! :-) Parts are getting pricey/rare but America is a great source as they had all the 'school bikes' (all the pro link bikes Honda USA couldn't sell they gave to schools and colleges to work on, they cannot go on the road so all get broken for parts!) so mine has a later clutch complete from a pro link (less rattles!) and a crank/rods/pistons and barrels from one as my engine was utterly ruined by an absolute gorilla that worked on it previously... he actually left out one rods worth of big end shells, with resultant damage to the crank! What a moron he was. Standard exhausts are rare, like rocking horse poo rare and if a set come up for sale, they are a tad pricey!

Riding it is okay but not as good as I remembered it from 35 years ago: the brakes are atrocious, the frame is not all that rigid and the engine still totally dominates the experience and with those pipes, it does sound rather epic!!!!!! Strangely, it feels much more old fashioned to ride than the Bonnie which really is old (1969) - go figure?
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Mark Luft
Frequent User
Username: bentleyman1993

Post Number: 70
Registered: 10-2016
Posted on Thursday, 18 May, 2017 - 02:36 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

David, had a similar story with a Yamaha. My first street bike was a 1971 Yamaha R5B 350cc. This was pre RD. I got it brand new, 2 months before my 16th birthday. Spent the first 2000 miles "trail ridding" that's what my folks thought. Anyway, loved that bike. Fast for the time and light weight. Sold it and moved on. About 15 years later, I wanted to "re-live" my youth with another R5 and found a nice one. But... A little more weight (me) and the fog of time, and it was not as I remembered. I rode it for a few months and sold it on.
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Robert Noel Reddington
Grand Master
Username: bob_uk

Post Number: 1426
Registered: 5-2015
Posted on Thursday, 18 May, 2017 - 03:36 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Sod RR/B old motor bike much more fun!
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Omar M. Shams
Grand Master
Username: omar

Post Number: 1202
Registered: 4-2009
Posted on Thursday, 18 May, 2017 - 04:24 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

One of the most potent bikes i had was a Honda CRM250. It was seriously scary.
Bought two of them together - one for me and one for the wife. She crashed hers way too often for me to think about giving up riding. Then came the kids and Dubai lost all its desert - so I sold both bikes.
CRM 250 - stroke hardly any weight and lots of horsepower. Enough adrenaline to almost make it feel like sex.....
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Patrick Lockyer.
Grand Master
Username: pat_lockyer

Post Number: 1351
Registered: 9-2004
Posted on Thursday, 18 May, 2017 - 05:37 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Kept most of mine for the memory's.
Café racer resting peacefully.


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John Beech
Grand Master
Username: jbeech

Post Number: 393
Registered: 10-2016
Posted on Thursday, 18 May, 2017 - 10:30 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Patrick, the Norton would be a lovely bike to clean up for around town use. You've got a seriously nice stash. Too bad you're in Blimey and I'm near the House of Mouse or we'd have to have a chin wag about finding at least that one bike a new home where she's be loved once again. That's serious old school cool ;>)
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ross kowalski
Grand Master
Username: cdfpw

Post Number: 429
Registered: 11-2015
Posted on Thursday, 18 May, 2017 - 11:06 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Vroom vroom, bow wow.





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ross kowalski
Grand Master
Username: cdfpw

Post Number: 430
Registered: 11-2015
Posted on Thursday, 18 May, 2017 - 11:47 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

The trip out wasn't bad, but the sidehack was a little squirly one the ride home.

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ross kowalski
Grand Master
Username: cdfpw

Post Number: 431
Registered: 11-2015
Posted on Thursday, 18 May, 2017 - 11:48 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

22hp, but if I eat a valve, I drive home.

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Alan Ford
Prolific User
Username: herne13

Post Number: 197
Registered: 8-2016
Posted on Thursday, 18 May, 2017 - 05:55 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

I used to own this before my Venous Ulcers got worse.



Harley Sportster 1200C All Sportsters are also known as Skirtsters here in Australia :-(
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Mark Taxis
Prolific User
Username: mark_taxis

Post Number: 143
Registered: 4-2007
Posted on Thursday, 18 May, 2017 - 08:24 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

I do not own any bikes ,but a good friend of mine has a beautiful collection of bikes, including 4 vincent black shadows all stored in a museum in Cairns, the museum is call "Blast from the Past" Worth a look if you are in Cairns
https://www.facebook.com/BlastfromthePast4870/
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Patrick Lockyer.
Grand Master
Username: pat_lockyer

Post Number: 1355
Registered: 9-2004
Posted on Thursday, 18 May, 2017 - 10:04 pm:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

Wow, Mark that is a whole Vincent, IMO mine is half a Vincent!
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Robert Noel Reddington
Grand Master
Username: bob_uk

Post Number: 1427
Registered: 5-2015
Posted on Friday, 19 May, 2017 - 01:54 am:   Edit PostDelete PostView Post/Check IP

I has a Vincent Comet 500 with side car. I sold it to Eric who ran out of brakes and ended in the school sports field. eric sold it to Allan and Allan got nicked for driving a combo on 2 wheels.
I brought the combo from Allan and went with girl friend to the 1970 isle of Wright pop festival.
The Comet had a double adult side car. I brought a Panther 600 with a sports single seat side car zeppelin and fitted the zeppelin to the comet. I sold both bikes on and made a small profit. then I discovered scramblers and scratchers.
A scratcher is a small capacity bike that can be laid over and slung round corners due to light weight and good tyres.
Best one I built was a honda CG125. Nowadays scratchers are called super motard, 3 times the power, I only had 15bhp /98kg/70mph

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